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Author

David B. Dunson

Bio: David B. Dunson is an academic researcher from Duke University. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Bayesian probability & Prior probability. The author has an hindex of 82, co-authored 617 publication(s) receiving 43759 citation(s). Previous affiliations of David B. Dunson include National Institutes of Health & Florida State University College of Arts and Sciences.
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Book
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: Detailed notes on Bayesian Computation Basics of Markov Chain Simulation, Regression Models, and Asymptotic Theorems are provided.
Abstract: FUNDAMENTALS OF BAYESIAN INFERENCE Probability and Inference Single-Parameter Models Introduction to Multiparameter Models Asymptotics and Connections to Non-Bayesian Approaches Hierarchical Models FUNDAMENTALS OF BAYESIAN DATA ANALYSIS Model Checking Evaluating, Comparing, and Expanding Models Modeling Accounting for Data Collection Decision Analysis ADVANCED COMPUTATION Introduction to Bayesian Computation Basics of Markov Chain Simulation Computationally Efficient Markov Chain Simulation Modal and Distributional Approximations REGRESSION MODELS Introduction to Regression Models Hierarchical Linear Models Generalized Linear Models Models for Robust Inference Models for Missing Data NONLINEAR AND NONPARAMETRIC MODELS Parametric Nonlinear Models Basic Function Models Gaussian Process Models Finite Mixture Models Dirichlet Process Models APPENDICES A: Standard Probability Distributions B: Outline of Proofs of Asymptotic Theorems C: Computation in R and Stan Bibliographic Notes and Exercises appear at the end of each chapter.

16,069 citations


01 Jan 2013

1,759 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Objective: Uterine leiomyoma, or fibroid tumors, are the leading indication for hysterectomy in the United States, but the proportion of women in whom fibroid tumors develop is not known. This study screened for fibroid tumors, independently of clinical symptoms, to estimate the age-specific proportion of black and white women in whom fibroid tumors develop. Study Design: Randomly selected members of an urban health plan who were 35 to 49 years old participated (n = 1364 women). Medical records and self-report were used to assess fibroid status for those women who were no longer menstruating (most of whom had had hysterectomies). Premenopausal women were screened by ultrasonography. We estimated the age-specific cumulative incidence of fibroid tumors for black and white women. Results: Thirty-five percent of premenopausal women had a previous diagnosis of fibroid tumors. Fifty-one percent of the premenopausal women who had no previous diagnosis had ultrasound evidence of fibroid tumors. The estimated cumulative incidence of tumors by age 50 was >80% for black women and nearly 70% for white women. The difference between the age-specific cumulative incidence curves for black and white women was highly significant (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.5-3.4; P Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that most black and white women in the United States develop uterine fibroid tumors before menopause and that uterine fibroid tumors develop in black women at earlier ages than in white women. (Am J Obstet Gynecol 2003;188:100-7.)

1,459 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: In this article, we review probabilistic topic models: graphical models that can be used to summarize a large collection of documents with a smaller number of distributions over words. Those distributions are called "topics" because, when fit to data, they capture the salient themes that run through the collection. We describe both finite-dimensional parametric topic models and their Bayesian nonparametric counterparts, which are based on the hierarchical Dirichlet process (HDP). We discuss two extensions of topic models to time-series data-one that lets the topics slowly change over time and one that lets the assumed prevalence of the topics change. Finally, we illustrate the application of topic models to nontext data, summarizing some recent research results in image analysis.

863 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Anupama Reddy1, Jenny Zhang1, Nicholas S. Davis1, Andrea B. Moffitt1  +55 moreInstitutions (17)
05 Oct 2017-Cell
TL;DR: An integrative analysis of whole-exome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing in a cohort of DLBCL patients is performed to comprehensively define the landscape of 150 genetic drivers of the disease and their functional roles to identify new therapeutic opportunities in the disease.
Abstract: Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of blood cancer and is characterized by a striking degree of genetic and clinical heterogeneity. This heterogeneity poses a major barrier to understanding the genetic basis of the disease and its response to therapy. Here, we performed an integrative analysis of whole-exome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing in a cohort of 1,001 DLBCL patients to comprehensively define the landscape of 150 genetic drivers of the disease. We characterized the functional impact of these genes using an unbiased CRISPR screen of DLBCL cell lines to define oncogenes that promote cell growth. A prognostic model comprising these genetic alterations outperformed current established methods: cell of origin, the International Prognostic Index comprising clinical variables, and dual MYC and BCL2 expression. These results comprehensively define the genetic drivers and their functional roles in DLBCL to identify new therapeutic opportunities in the disease.

483 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Maximum likelihood or restricted maximum likelihood (REML) estimates of the parameters in linear mixed-effects models can be determined using the lmer function in the lme4 package for R. As for most model-fitting functions in R, the model is described in an lmer call by a formula, in this case including both fixed- and random-effects terms. The formula and data together determine a numerical representation of the model from which the profiled deviance or the profiled REML criterion can be evaluated as a function of some of the model parameters. The appropriate criterion is optimized, using one of the constrained optimization functions in R, to provide the parameter estimates. We describe the structure of the model, the steps in evaluating the profiled deviance or REML criterion, and the structure of classes or types that represents such a model. Sufficient detail is included to allow specialization of these structures by users who wish to write functions to fit specialized linear mixed models, such as models incorporating pedigrees or smoothing splines, that are not easily expressible in the formula language used by lmer.

37,650 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work proposes a generative model for text and other collections of discrete data that generalizes or improves on several previous models including naive Bayes/unigram, mixture of unigrams, and Hofmann's aspect model.
Abstract: We describe latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA), a generative probabilistic model for collections of discrete data such as text corpora. LDA is a three-level hierarchical Bayesian model, in which each item of a collection is modeled as a finite mixture over an underlying set of topics. Each topic is, in turn, modeled as an infinite mixture over an underlying set of topic probabilities. In the context of text modeling, the topic probabilities provide an explicit representation of a document. We present efficient approximate inference techniques based on variational methods and an EM algorithm for empirical Bayes parameter estimation. We report results in document modeling, text classification, and collaborative filtering, comparing to a mixture of unigrams model and the probabilistic LSI model.

27,392 citations


Proceedings Article
03 Jan 2001
Abstract: We propose a generative model for text and other collections of discrete data that generalizes or improves on several previous models including naive Bayes/unigram, mixture of unigrams [6], and Hof-mann's aspect model, also known as probabilistic latent semantic indexing (pLSI) [3]. In the context of text modeling, our model posits that each document is generated as a mixture of topics, where the continuous-valued mixture proportions are distributed as a latent Dirichlet random variable. Inference and learning are carried out efficiently via variational algorithms. We present empirical results on applications of this model to problems in text modeling, collaborative filtering, and text classification.

25,546 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 2000-Genetics
Abstract: We describe a model-based clustering method for using multilocus genotype data to infer population structure and assign individuals to populations. We assume a model in which there are K populations (where K may be unknown), each of which is characterized by a set of allele frequencies at each locus. Individuals in the sample are assigned (probabilistically) to populations, or jointly to two or more populations if their genotypes indicate that they are admixed. Our model does not assume a particular mutation process, and it can be applied to most of the commonly used genetic markers, provided that they are not closely linked. Applications of our method include demonstrating the presence of population structure, assigning individuals to populations, studying hybrid zones, and identifying migrants and admixed individuals. We show that the method can produce highly accurate assignments using modest numbers of loci— e.g. , seven microsatellite loci in an example using genotype data from an endangered bird species. The software used for this article is available from http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/~pritch/home.html.

25,033 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Thomas G. Dietterich1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: Machine learning addresses many of the same research questions as the fields of statistics, data mining, and psychology, but with differences of emphasis.
Abstract: Machine Learning is the study of methods for programming computers to learn. Computers are applied to a wide range of tasks, and for most of these it is relatively easy for programmers to design and implement the necessary software. However, there are many tasks for which this is difficult or impossible. These can be divided into four general categories. First, there are problems for which there exist no human experts. For example, in modern automated manufacturing facilities, there is a need to predict machine failures before they occur by analyzing sensor readings. Because the machines are new, there are no human experts who can be interviewed by a programmer to provide the knowledge necessary to build a computer system. A machine learning system can study recorded data and subsequent machine failures and learn prediction rules. Second, there are problems where human experts exist, but where they are unable to explain their expertise. This is the case in many perceptual tasks, such as speech recognition, hand-writing recognition, and natural language understanding. Virtually all humans exhibit expert-level abilities on these tasks, but none of them can describe the detailed steps that they follow as they perform them. Fortunately, humans can provide machines with examples of the inputs and correct outputs for these tasks, so machine learning algorithms can learn to map the inputs to the outputs. Third, there are problems where phenomena are changing rapidly. In finance, for example, people would like to predict the future behavior of the stock market, of consumer purchases, or of exchange rates. These behaviors change frequently, so that even if a programmer could construct a good predictive computer program, it would need to be rewritten frequently. A learning program can relieve the programmer of this burden by constantly modifying and tuning a set of learned prediction rules. Fourth, there are applications that need to be customized for each computer user separately. Consider, for example, a program to filter unwanted electronic mail messages. Different users will need different filters. It is unreasonable to expect each user to program his or her own rules, and it is infeasible to provide every user with a software engineer to keep the rules up-to-date. A machine learning system can learn which mail messages the user rejects and maintain the filtering rules automatically. Machine learning addresses many of the same research questions as the fields of statistics, data mining, and psychology, but with differences of emphasis. Statistics focuses on understanding the phenomena that have generated the data, often with the goal of testing different hypotheses about those phenomena. Data mining seeks to find patterns in the data that are understandable by people. Psychological studies of human learning aspire to understand the mechanisms underlying the various learning behaviors exhibited by people (concept learning, skill acquisition, strategy change, etc.).

12,323 citations


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Performance
Metrics

Author's H-index: 82

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
202125
202044
201942
201835
201739
201642