Example of Green Chemistry format
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Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format
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Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format Example of Green Chemistry format
Sample paper formatted on SciSpace - SciSpace
This content is only for preview purposes. The original open access content can be found here.
open access Open Access ISSN: 14639262 e-ISSN: 14639270
recommended Recommended

Green Chemistry — Template for authors

Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Pollution #3 of 132 down down by 1 rank
Environmental Chemistry #5 of 122 down down by 3 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 2585 Published Papers | 39394 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 19/06/2020
Insights & related journals
General info
Top papers
Popular templates
Get started guide
Why choose from SciSpace
FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

9.48

1% from 2018

Impact factor for Green Chemistry from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 9.48
2018 9.405
2017 8.586
2016 9.125
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 1% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

15.2

4% from 2019

CiteRatio for Green Chemistry from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 15.2
2019 15.8
2018 15.7
2017 15.1
2016 13.8
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has decreased by 4% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

2.221

2% from 2019

SJR for Green Chemistry from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 2.221
2019 2.259
2018 2.517
2017 2.496
2016 2.598
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 2% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.882

2% from 2019

SNIP for Green Chemistry from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.882
2019 1.928
2018 1.84
2017 1.838
2016 2.029
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has decreased by 2% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Related Journals

open access Open Access ISSN: 15226514 e-ISSN: 15497879

Taylor and Francis

CiteRatio: 4.8 | SJR: 0.617 | SNIP: 0.924
ISSN: 17545692 e-ISSN: 17545706
recommended Recommended

Royal Society of Chemistry

CiteRatio: 51.6 | SJR: 14.486 | SNIP: 4.922
open access Open Access ISSN: 9239820 e-ISSN: 15729729

Springer

CiteRatio: 5.4 | SJR: 0.842 | SNIP: 1.13
open access Open Access ISSN: 18666280 e-ISSN: 18666299

Springer

CiteRatio: 4.5 | SJR: 0.641 | SNIP: 1.11
Green Chemistry

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Royal Society of Chemistry

Green Chemistry

Green Chemistry provides a unique forum for the publication of innovative research on the development of alternative sustainable technologies. With a wide general appeal, Green Chemistry publishes urgent communications and high quality research papers as well as review article...... Read More

Environmental Chemistry

Pollution

Environmental Science

i
Last updated on
19 Jun 2020
i
ISSN
1463-9262
i
Impact Factor
Maximum - 9.125
i
Acceptance Rate
Not provided
i
Frequency
Not provided
i
Open Access
Yes
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Yellow faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
i
Endnote Style
Download Available
i
Bibliography Name
numbers
i
Citation Type
Numbered (Superscripted)
25
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Bibliography Example
C. W. J. Beenakker, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2006, 97, 067007.

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1039/B103275P
Characterization and comparison of hydrophilic and hydrophobic room temperature ionic liquids incorporating the imidazolium cation
01 Jan 2001 - Green Chemistry

Abstract:

A series of hydrophilic and hydrophobic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) have been prepared and characterized to determine how water content, density, viscosity, surface tension, melting point, and thermal stability are affected by changes in alkyl chain length and anion. In the series of RTI... A series of hydrophilic and hydrophobic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) have been prepared and characterized to determine how water content, density, viscosity, surface tension, melting point, and thermal stability are affected by changes in alkyl chain length and anion. In the series of RTILs studied here, the choice of anion determines water miscibility and has the most dramatic effect on the properties. Hydrophilic anions (e.g., chloride and iodide) produce ionic liquids that are miscible in any proportion with water but, upon the removal of some water from the solution, illustrate how sensitive the physical properties are to a change in water content. In comparison, for ionic liquids containing more hydrophobic anions (e.g., PF6− and N(SO2CF3)2−), the removal of water has a smaller affect on the resulting properties. For a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations, increasing the alkyl chain length from butyl to hexyl to octyl increases the hydrophobicity and the viscosities of the ionic liquids increase, whereas densities and surface tension values decrease. Thermal analyses indicate high temperatures are attainable prior to decomposition and DSC studies reveal a glass transition for several samples. ILs incorporating PF6− have been used in liquid/liquid partitioning of organic molecules from water and the results for two of these are also discussed here. On a cautionary note, the chemistry of the individual cations and anions of the ILs should not be overlooked as, in the case of certain conditions for PF6− ILs, contact with an aqueous phase may result in slow hydrolysis of the PF6− with the concomitant release of HF and other species. read more read less

Topics:

Ionic liquid (63%)63% related to the paper, 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (59%)59% related to the paper, C4mim (56%)56% related to the paper, Miscibility (55%)55% related to the paper, Alkyl (53%)53% related to the paper
3,297 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1039/B922014C
Technology development for the production of biobased products from biorefinery carbohydrates—the US Department of Energy’s “Top 10” revisited
Joseph J. Bozell1, Gene R. Petersen2
06 Apr 2010 - Green Chemistry

Abstract:

A biorefinery that supplements its manufacture of low value biofuels with high value biobased chemicals can enable efforts to reduce nonrenewable fuel consumption while simultaneously providing the necessary financial incentive to stimulate expansion of the biorefining industry. However, the choice of appropriate products for... A biorefinery that supplements its manufacture of low value biofuels with high value biobased chemicals can enable efforts to reduce nonrenewable fuel consumption while simultaneously providing the necessary financial incentive to stimulate expansion of the biorefining industry. However, the choice of appropriate products for addition to the biorefinery's portfolio is challenged by a lack of broad-based conversion technology coupled with a plethora of potential targets. In 2004, the US Department of Energy (DOE) addressed these challenges by describing a selection process for chemical products that combined identification of a small group of compounds derived from biorefinery carbohydrates with the research and technology needs required for their production. The intent of the report was to catalyze research efforts to synthesize multiple members of this group, or, ideally, structures not yet on the list. In the six years since DOE's original report, considerable progress has been made in the use of carbohydrates as starting materials for chemical production. This review presents an updated evaluation of potential target structures using similar selection methodology, and an overview of the technology developments that led to the inclusion of a given compound. The list provides a dynamic guide to technology development that could realize commercial success through the proper integration of biofuels with biobased products. read more read less

Topics:

Biorefinery (56%)56% related to the paper, Biorefining (52%)52% related to the paper
2,953 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1039/C1GC15386B
Green synthesis of metal nanoparticles using plants
Siavash Iravani1
10 Jan 2011 - Green Chemistry

Abstract:

In recent years, the development of efficient green chemistry methods for synthesis of metal nanoparticles has become a major focus of researchers. They have investigated in order to find an eco-friendly technique for production of well-characterized nanoparticles. One of the most considered methods is production of metal nan... In recent years, the development of efficient green chemistry methods for synthesis of metal nanoparticles has become a major focus of researchers. They have investigated in order to find an eco-friendly technique for production of well-characterized nanoparticles. One of the most considered methods is production of metal nanoparticles using organisms. Among these organisms plants seem to be the best candidates and they are suitable for large-scale biosynthesis of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles produced by plants are more stable and the rate of synthesis is faster than in the case of microorganisms. Moreover, the nanoparticles are more various in shape and size in comparison with those produced by other organisms. The advantages of using plant and plant-derived materials for biosynthesis of metal nanoparticles have interested researchers to investigate mechanisms of metal ions uptake and bioreduction by plants, and to understand the possible mechanism of metal nanoparticle formation in plants. In this review, most of the plants used in metal nanoparticle synthesis are shown. read more read less

Topics:

Green nanotechnology (52%)52% related to the paper
1,889 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1039/C004654J
Catalytic conversion of biomass to biofuels
David Martin Alonso1, Jesse Q. Bond1, James A. Dumesic1
03 Sep 2010 - Green Chemistry

Abstract:

Biomass has received considerable attention as a sustainable feedstock that can replace diminishing fossil fuels for the production of energy, especially for the transportation sector. The overall strategy in the production of hydrocarbon fuels from biomass is (i) to reduce the substantial oxygen content of the parent feedsto... Biomass has received considerable attention as a sustainable feedstock that can replace diminishing fossil fuels for the production of energy, especially for the transportation sector. The overall strategy in the production of hydrocarbon fuels from biomass is (i) to reduce the substantial oxygen content of the parent feedstock to improve energy density and (ii) to create C–C bonds between biomass-derived intermediates to increase the molecular weight of the final hydrocarbon product. We begin this review with a brief overview of first-generation biofuels, specifically bioethanol and biodiesel. We consider the implications of utilizing starchy and triglyceride feedstocks from traditional food crops, and we provide an overview of second-generation technologies to process the major constituents of more abundant lignocellulosic biomass, such as thermochemical routes (gasification, pyrolysis, liquefaction) which directly process whole lignocellulose to upgradeable platforms (e.g., synthesis gas and bio-oil). The primary focus of this review is an overview of catalytic strategies to produce biofuels from aqueous solutions of carbohydrates, which are isolated through biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis. Although hydrolysis-based platforms are associated with higher upstream costs arising from pretreatment and hydrolysis, the aqueous solutions of biomass-derived compounds can be processed selectively to yield hydrocarbons with targeted molecular weights and structures. For example, sugars can be used as reforming feedstocks for the production of renewable hydrogen, or they can be dehydrated to yield furfurals or levulinic acid. For each of the platforms discussed, we have suggested relevant strategies for the formation of C–C bonds, such as aldol condensation of ketones and oligomerization of alkenes, to enable the production of gasoline, jet, and Diesel fuel range hydrocarbons. Finally, we address the importance of hydrogen in biorefining and discuss strategies for managing its consumption to ensure independence from fossil fuels. read more read less

Topics:

Renewable fuels (61%)61% related to the paper, Lignocellulosic biomass (61%)61% related to the paper, Biomass to liquid (61%)61% related to the paper, Biofuel (59%)59% related to the paper, Biomass (58%)58% related to the paper
View PDF
1,756 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1039/B601395C
Dissolution of cellulose with ionic liquids and its application : a mini-review
Shengdong Zhu1, Yuanxin Wu1, Qiming Chen1, Ziniu Yu2, Cunwen Wang1, Shiwei Jin1, Yigang Ding1, Gang Wu3
30 Mar 2006 - Green Chemistry

Abstract:

Dissolution of cellulose with ionic liquids allows the comprehensive utilization of cellulose by combining two major green chemistry principles: using environmentally preferable solvents and bio-renewable feed-stocks. In this paper, the dissolution of cellulose with ionic liquids and its application were reviewed. Cellulose c... Dissolution of cellulose with ionic liquids allows the comprehensive utilization of cellulose by combining two major green chemistry principles: using environmentally preferable solvents and bio-renewable feed-stocks. In this paper, the dissolution of cellulose with ionic liquids and its application were reviewed. Cellulose can be dissolved, without derivation, in some hydrophilic ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl) and 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AMIMCl). Microwave heating significantly accelerates the dissolution process. Cellulose can be easily regenerated from its ionic liquid solutions by addition of water, ethanol or acetone. After its regeneration, the ionic liquids can be recovered and reused. Fractionation of lignocellulosic materials and preparation of cellulose derivatives and composites are two of its typical applications. Although some basic studies, such as economical syntheses of ionic liquids and studies of ionic liquid toxicology, are still much needed, commercialization of these processes has made great progress in recent years. read more read less

Topics:

Ionic liquid (62%)62% related to the paper, Cellulose (59%)59% related to the paper, Dissolution (54%)54% related to the paper
1,414 Citations
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SciSpace is a very innovative solution to the formatting problem and existing providers, such as Mendeley or Word did not really evolve in recent years.

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With SciSpace, you do not need a word template for Green Chemistry.

It automatically formats your research paper to Royal Society of Chemistry formatting guidelines and citation style.

You can download a submission ready research paper in pdf, LaTeX and docx formats.

Time comparison

Time taken to format a paper and Compliance with guidelines

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Green Chemistry format uses numbers citation style.

Automatically format and order your citations and bibliography in a click.

SciSpace allows imports from all reference managers like Mendeley, Zotero, Endnote, Google Scholar etc.

Frequently asked questions

Absolutely not! With our tool, you can freely write without having to focus on LaTeX. You can write your entire paper as per the Green Chemistry guidelines and autoformat it.

Yes. The template is fully compliant as per the guidelines of this journal. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. Also, if there's any update in the journal format guidelines, we take care of it and include that in our algorithm.

Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Green Chemistry citation style.

You can avail our Free Trial for 7 days. I'm sure you'll find our features very helpful. Plus, it's quite inexpensive.

Yup. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word doc and click on auto-format. You'll have a publish-ready paper that you can download at the end.

A matter of seconds. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves a load of your time in writing and formating your manuscript.

One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Green Chemistry's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

Absolutely! You can do it using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, you can always contact our support team.

SciSpace is an online tool for now. We'll soon release a desktop version. You can also request (or upvote) any feature that you think might be helpful for you and the research community in the feature request section once you sign-up with us.

Sure. You can request any template and we'll have it up and running within a matter of 3 working days. You can find the request box in the Journal Gallery on the right sidebar under the heading, "Couldn't find the format you were looking for?".

After you have written and autoformatted your paper, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx and LaTeX.

To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

Our journal submission experts are skilled in submitting papers to various international journals.

After uploading your paper on SciSpace, you would see a button to request a journal submission service for Green Chemistry.

Each submission service is completed within 4 - 5 working days.

Yes. SciSpace provides this functionality.

After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or .bib file.

SciSpace would allow download of your references in Green Chemistry Endnote style, according to royal-society-of-chemistry guidelines.

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I spent hours with MS word for reformatting. It was frustrating - plain and simple. With SciSpace, I can draft my manuscripts and once it is finished I can just submit. In case, I have to submit to another journal it is really just a button click instead of an afternoon of reformatting.

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