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Journal ArticleDOI

The Benefits of Facebook “Friends:” Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites

01 Jul 2007-Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication (Wiley/Blackwell (10.1111))-Vol. 12, Iss: 4, pp 1143-1168

TL;DR: Facebook usage was found to interact with measures of psychological well-being, suggesting that it might provide greater benefits for users experiencing low self-esteem and low life satisfaction.
Abstract: This study examines the relationship between use of Facebook, a popular online social network site, and the formation and maintenance of social capital. In addition to assessing bonding and bridging social capital, we explore a dimension of social capital that assesses one’s ability to stay connected with members of a previously inhabited community, which we call maintained social capital. Regression analyses conducted on results from a survey of undergraduate students (N = 286) suggest a strong association between use of Facebook and the three types of social capital, with the strongest relationship being to bridging social capital. In addition, Facebook usage was found to interact with measures of psychological well-being, suggesting that it might provide greater benefits for users experiencing low self-esteem and low life satisfaction.
Topics: Individual capital (68%), Social mobility (66%), Social status (66%), Social capital (65%), Social engagement (65%)
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
danah boyd1, Nicole B. Ellison2Institutions (2)
TL;DR: This publication contains reprint articles for which IEEE does not hold copyright and which are likely to be copyrighted.
Abstract: Social network sites SNSs are increasingly attracting the attention of academic and industry researchers intrigued by their affordances and reach This special theme section of the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication brings together scholarship on these emergent phenomena In this introductory article, we describe features of SNSs and propose a comprehensive definition We then present one perspective on the history of such sites, discussing key changes and developments After briefly summarizing existing scholarship concerning SNSs, we discuss the articles in this special section and conclude with considerations for future research

14,041 citations


Cites background from "The Benefits of Facebook “Friends:”..."

  • ...Ellison, Steinfield, and Lampe (2007) suggest that Facebook is used to maintain existing offline relationships or solidify offline connections, as opposed to meeting new people....

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  • ...This is one of the chief dimensions that differentiate SNSs from earlier forms of public CMC such as newsgroups (Ellison et al., 2007)....

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Book
Sherry Turkle1Institutions (1)
01 Jan 2011-
Abstract: Consider Facebookits human contact, only easier to engage with and easier to avoid. Developing technology promises closeness. Sometimes it delivers, but much of our modern life leaves us less connected with people and more connected to simulations of them. In Alone Together, MIT technology and society professor Sherry Turkle explores the power of our new tools and toys to dramatically alter our social lives. Its a nuanced exploration of what we are looking forand sacrificingin a world of electronic companions and social networking tools, and an argument that, despite the hand-waving of todays self-described prophets of the future, it will be the next generation who will chart the path between isolation and connectivity.

2,307 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Positive relationships between intensity of Facebook use and students' life satisfaction, social trust, civic engagement, and political participation are found, suggesting that online social networks are not the most effective solution for youth disengagement from civic duty and democracy.
Abstract: This study examines if Facebook, one of the most popular social network sites among college students in the U.S., is related to attitudes and behaviors that enhance individuals' social capital. Using data from a random web survey of college students across Texas (n = 2,603), we find positive relationships between intensity of Facebook use and students' life satisfaction, social trust, civic engagement, and political participation. While these findings should ease the concerns of those who fear that Facebook has mostly negative effects on young adults, the positive and significant associations between Facebook variables and social capital were small, suggesting that online social networks are not the most effective solution for youth disengagement from civic duty and democracy.

1,917 citations


Cites background or methods from "The Benefits of Facebook “Friends:”..."

  • ...By using SNSs, individuals seek to maintain and increase their social networks (Ellison et al., 2007; Joinson, 2008)....

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  • ...A more complete measure of intensity of Facebook use was developed by Ellison, Steinfield, and Lampe (2007), who created a scale to gauge user engagement in Facebook activities based on number of ‘‘friends,’’ amount of time spent on the network on a typical day, and level of agreement with several…...

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  • ...For instance, college students with lower levels of life satisfaction could seek to participate in online networks to increase their personal well-being (Ellison et al., 2007)....

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  • ...Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication...

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  • ...This proposition was empirically tested by Ellison, Steinfield, and Lampe (2007) using survey data from a small sample of undergraduate students in the U.S....

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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Millions of contemporary young adults use social networking sites However, little is known about how much, why, and how they use these sites In this study, 92 undergraduates completed a diary-like measure each day for a week, reporting daily time use and responding to an activities checklist to assess their use of the popular social networking site, Facebook At the end of the week, they also completed a follow-up survey Results indicated that students use Facebook approximately 30 min throughout the day as part of their daily routine Students communicated on Facebook using a one-to-many style, in which they were the creators disseminating content to their friends Even so, they spent more time observing content on Facebook than actually posting content Facebook was used most often for social interaction, primarily with friends with whom the students had a pre-established relationship offline In addition to classic identity markers of emerging adulthood, such as religion, political ideology, and work, young adults also used media preferences to express their identity Implications of social networking site use for the development of identity and peer relationships are discussed

1,905 citations


Cites background or result from "The Benefits of Facebook “Friends:”..."

  • ...A recent survey of college students in the U.S. showed that social networking sites are used for social interaction with offline acquaintances in order to maintain friendships rather than to make new friends (Ellison et al., 2007)....

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  • ...Only about 9% of our young adult sample used Facebook to make new friends, a finding consistent with those reported by Ellison et al. (2007) for college students, but which differs from findings with teens, about half of whom use social networking sites to make new friends (Lenhart &Madden, 2007)....

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  • ...Previous studies have found that more than 90% of college students use Facebook (Ellison et al., 2007; Wiley & Sisson, 2006)....

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  • ...All rights reserved....

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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: A longitudinal analysis of panel data from users of a popular online social network site, Facebook, investigated the relationship between intensity of Facebook use, measures of psychological well-being, and bridging social capital. Two surveys conducted a year apart at a large U.S. university, complemented with in-depth interviews with 18 Facebook users, provide the study data. Intensity of Facebook use in year one strongly predicted bridging social capital outcomes in year two, even after controlling for measures of self-esteem and satisfaction with life. These latter psychological variables were also strongly associated with social capital outcomes. Self-esteem served to moderate the relationship between Facebook usage intensity and bridging social capital: those with lower self-esteem gained more from their use of Facebook in terms of bridging social capital than higher self-esteem participants. We suggest that Facebook affordances help reduce barriers that lower self-esteem students might experience in forming the kinds of large, heterogeneous networks that are sources of bridging social capital.

1,754 citations


Cites background or methods or result from "The Benefits of Facebook “Friends:”..."

  • ...Again following Ellison et al. (2007) , an amended version of the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS; Diener, Suh, & Oishi, 1997;...

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  • ...In one of the fewattempts to examine the effect of social network site use on social capital among young people, Ellison et al. (2007) surveyed users of Facebook at a large Midwestern University....

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  • ...Our bridging social capital measure was constructed as described by Ellison et al. (2007)....

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  • ...In Ellison et al. (2007), a strong association was found between the intensity of Facebook use and a participant's perceived bridging social capital....

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  • ...However, with data at only one point in time, it was not possible for Ellison et al. (2007) to establish any time order to the relationships among Facebook use, self-esteem, and social capital....

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References
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Journal ArticleDOI
Mark Granovetter1Institutions (1)
Abstract: Analysis of social networks is suggested as a tool for linking micro and macro levels of sociological theory. The procedure is illustrated by elaboration of the macro implications of one aspect of small-scale interaction: the strength of dyadic ties. It is argued that the degree of overlap of two individuals' friendship networks varies directly with the strength of their tie to one another. The impact of this principle on diffusion of influence and information, mobility opportunity, and community organization is explored. Stress is laid on the cohesive power of weak ties. Most network models deal, implicitly, with strong ties, thus confining their applicability to small, well-defined groups. Emphasis on weak ties lends itself to discussion of relations between groups and to analysis of segments of social structure not easily defined in terms of primary groups.

35,312 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: In this paper, the concept of social capital is introduced and illustrated, its forms are described, the social structural conditions under which it arises are examined, and it is used in an analys...

30,215 citations


"The Benefits of Facebook “Friends:”..." refers background or methods in this paper

  • ...In 2006, Facebook was used at over 2,000 United States colleges and was the seventh most popular site on the World Wide Web with respect to total page views (Cassidy, 2006)....

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  • ...The site is tightly integrated into the daily media practices of its users: The typical user spends about 20 minutes a day on the site, and two-thirds of users log in at least once a day (Cassidy, 2006; Needham & Company, 2007)....

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Book
21 Apr 1965-

20,078 citations




Performance
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No. of citations received by the Paper in previous years
YearCitations
202212
2021488
2020557
2019586
2018664
2017745