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Institution

Budapest University of Technology and Economics

EducationBudapest, Pest, Hungary
About: Budapest University of Technology and Economics is a education organization based out in Budapest, Pest, Hungary. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Nonlinear system & Control theory. The organization has 8526 authors who have published 23680 publications receiving 376361 citations. The organization is also known as: Royal Technical University of Budapest & Royal Joseph Technical University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation is introduced that improves equilibrium properties of densely packed solids and their surfaces.
Abstract: Popular modern generalized gradient approximations are biased toward the description of free-atom energies. Restoration of the first-principles gradient expansion for exchange over a wide range of density gradients eliminates this bias. We introduce a revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation that improves equilibrium properties of densely packed solids and their surfaces.

7,797 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Daniel J. Klionsky1, Kotb Abdelmohsen2, Akihisa Abe3, Joynal Abedin4  +2519 moreInstitutions (695)
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macro-autophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes.
Abstract: In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. For example, a key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process versus those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process including the amount and rate of cargo sequestered and degraded). In particular, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation must be differentiated from stimuli that increase autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. It is worth emphasizing here that lysosomal digestion is a stage of autophagy and evaluating its competence is a crucial part of the evaluation of autophagic flux, or complete autophagy. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. Along these lines, because of the potential for pleiotropic effects due to blocking autophagy through genetic manipulation, it is imperative to target by gene knockout or RNA interference more than one autophagy-related protein. In addition, some individual Atg proteins, or groups of proteins, are involved in other cellular pathways implying that not all Atg proteins can be used as a specific marker for an autophagic process. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.

5,187 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For example, this article argued that the private sector is a self-regulating mechanism and that any government action beyond maintenance of law and order is "interference" with it rather than an intrinsic part of it.
Abstract: IN SPITE of the tremendous importance of government decisions in every phase of economic life, economic theorists have never successfully integrated government with private decision-makers in a single general equilibrium theory. Instead they have treated government action as an exogenous variable, determined by political considerations that lie outside the purview of economics. This view is really a carry-over from the classical premise that the private sector is a self-regulating mechanism and that any government action beyond maintenance of law and order is "interference" with it rather than an intrinsic part of it.2 However, in at least two fields of economic theory, the centrality of government action has forced economists to formulate rules that indicate how government "should" make decisions. Thus in the field of public finance, Hugh Dalton states:

2,722 citations

01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: OMNeT++ is fully programmable and modular, and it was designed from the ground up to support modeling very large networks built from reusable model components.
Abstract: The paper introduces OMNeT++, a C++-based discrete event simulation package primarily targeted at simulating computer networks and other distributed systems. OMNeT++ is fully programmable and modular, and it was designed from the ground up to support modeling very large networks built from reusable model components. Large emphasis was placed also on easy traceability and debuggability of simulation models: one can execute the simulation under a powerful graphical user interface, which makes the internals of a simulation model fully visible to the person running the simulation: it displays the network graphics, animates the message flow and lets the user peek into objects and variables within the model. These features make OMNeT++ a good candidate for both research and educational purposes. The OMNeT++ simulation engine can be easily embedded into larger applications. OMNeT++ is opensource, free for non-profit use, and it has a fairly large user

2,316 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The first algorithm that finds both overlapping communities and the hierarchical structure is presented, based on the local optimization of a fitness function, enabling different hierarchical levels of organization to be investigated.
Abstract: Many networks in nature, society and technology are characterized by a mesoscopic level of organization, with groups of nodes forming tightly connected units, called communities or modules, that are only weakly linked to each other. Uncovering this community structure is one of the most important problems in the field of complex networks. Networks often show a hierarchical organization, with communities embedded within other communities; moreover, nodes can be shared between different communities. Here, we present the first algorithm that finds both overlapping communities and the hierarchical structure. The method is based on the local optimization of a fitness function. Community structure is revealed by peaks in the fitness histogram. The resolution can be tuned by a parameter enabling different hierarchical levels of organization to be investigated. Tests on real and artificial networks give excellent results.

1,852 citations


Authors

Showing all 8667 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Albert-László Barabási152438200119
Csaba Hajdu129139590105
Gustavo E. Scuseria12065895195
Stefan Grimme113680105087
Tamas L. Horvath10748342023
John P. Perdew104410262613
Giulia Galli8744730486
Celso Grebogi7648822450
Laura Gagliardi7648621715
József Karger-Kocsis6537516216
János Kertész6436919276
Géza Kovács6431214346
Hideki Hashimoto63104517084
Mark H. Rümmeli6340314536
Endre Szemerédi6018615253
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
202378
2022198
20211,263
20201,303
20191,385
20181,321