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JournalISSN: 1389-9457

Sleep Medicine 

About: Sleep Medicine is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Polysomnography & Obstructive sleep apnea. It has an ISSN identifier of 1389-9457. Over the lifetime, 5920 publication(s) have been published receiving 157496 citation(s).


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TL;DR: The clinical validation of the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) indicates that the ISI is a reliable and valid instrument to quantify perceived insomnia severity and is likely to be a clinically useful tool as a screening device or as an outcome measure in insomnia treatment research.
Abstract: Background: Insomnia is a prevalent health complaint that is often difficult to evaluate reliably. There is an important need for brief and valid assessment tools to assist practitioners in the clinical evaluation of insomnia complaints.Objective: This paper reports on the clinical validation of the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) as a brief screening measure of insomnia and as an outcome measure in treatment research. The psychometric properties (internal consistency, concurrent validity, factor structure) of the ISI were evaluated in two samples of insomnia patients.Methods: The first study examined the internal consistency and concurrent validity of the ISI in 145 patients evaluated for insomnia at a sleep disorders clinic. Data from the ISI were compared to those of a sleep diary measure. In the second study, the concurrent validity of the ISI was evaluated in a sample of 78 older patients who participated in a randomized-controlled trial of behavioral and pharmacological therapies for insomnia. Change scores on the ISI over time were compared with those obtained from sleep diaries and polysomnography. Comparisons were also made between ISI scores obtained from patients, significant others, and clinicians.Results: The results of Study 1 showed that the ISI has adequate internal consistency and is a reliable self-report measure to evaluate perceived sleep difficulties. The results from Study 2 also indicated that the ISI is a valid and sensitive measure to detect changes in perceived sleep difficulties with treatment. In addition, there is a close convergence between scores obtained from the ISI patient's version and those from the clinician's and significant other's versions.Conclusions: The present findings indicate that the ISI is a reliable and valid instrument to quantify perceived insomnia severity. The ISI is likely to be a clinically useful tool as a screening device or as an outcome measure in insomnia treatment research.

3,927 citations

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3,115 citations

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TL;DR: Modification of the criteria for the diagnosis of restless legs syndrome is modified to better reflect that increased body of knowledge, as well as to clarify slight confusion with the wording of the original criteria.
Abstract: Background : Restless legs syndrome is a common yet frequently undiagnosed sensorimotor disorder. In 1995, the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group developed standardized criteria for the diagnosis of restless legs syndrome. Since that time, additional scientific scrutiny and clinical experience have led to a better understanding of the condition. Modification of the criteria is now necessary to better reflect that increased body of knowledge, as well as to clarify slight confusion with the wording of the original criteria. Setting : The restless legs syndrome diagnostic criteria and epidemiology workshop at the National Institutes of Health. Participants : Members of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group and authorities on epidemiology and the design of questionnaires and scales. Objective : To modify the current criteria for the diagnosis of restless legs syndrome, to develop new criteria for the diagnosis of restless legs syndrome in the cognitively impaired elderly and in children, to create standardized criteria for the identification of augmentation, and to establish consistent questions for use in epidemiology studies. Results : The essential diagnostic criteria for restless legs syndrome were developed and approved by workshop participants and the executive committee of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group. Criteria were also developed and approved for the additional aforementioned groups.

2,705 citations

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TL;DR: This scale meets performance criteria for a brief, patient completed instrument that can be used to assess RLS severity for purposes of clinical assessment, research, or therapeutic trials and supports a finding that RLS is a relatively uniform disorder in which the severity of the basic symptoms is strongly related to their impact on the patient's life.
Abstract: BACKGROUND There is a need for an easily administered instrument which can be applied to all patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) to measure disease severity for clinical assessment, research, or therapeutic trials The pathophysiology of RLS is not clear and no objective measure so far devised can apply to all patients or accurately reflect severity Moreover, RLS is primarily a subjective disorder Therefore, a subjective scale is at present the optimal instrument to meet this need METHODS Twenty centers from six countries participated in an initial reliability and validation study of a rating scale for the severity of RLS designed by the International RLS study group (IRLSSG) A ten-question scale was developed on the basis of repeated expert evaluation of potential items This scale, the IRLSSG rating scale (IRLS), was administered to 196 RLS patients, most on some medication, and 209 control subjects RESULTS The IRLS was found to have high levels of internal consistency, inter-examiner reliability, test-retest reliability over a 2-4 week period, and convergent validity It also demonstrated criterion validity when tested against the current criterion of a clinical global impression and readily discriminated patient from control groups The scale was dominated by a single severity factor that explained at least 59% of the pooled item variance CONCLUSIONS This scale meets performance criteria for a brief, patient completed instrument that can be used to assess RLS severity for purposes of clinical assessment, research, or therapeutic trials It supports a finding that RLS is a relatively uniform disorder in which the severity of the basic symptoms is strongly related to their impact on the patient's life In future studies, the IRLS should be tested against objective measures of RLS severity and its sensitivity should be studied as RLS severity is systematically manipulated by therapeutic interventions

1,308 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

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TL;DR: These scales for childhood SRBDs, snoring, sleepiness, and behavior are valid and reliable instruments that can be used to identifySRBDs or associated symptom-constructs in clinical research when polysomnography is not feasible.
Abstract: Objective: To develop and validate questionnaire scales that can be used in research to investigate the presence of childhood SRBDs and prominent symptom complexes, including snoring, daytime sleepiness, and related behavioral disturbances. Background: Obstructive sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs) are common but usually undiagnosed among children. Methods to help identify SRBDs without the expense of polysomnography could greatly facilitate clinical and epidemiological research. Methods: Subjects were children aged 2‐18 years who had polysomnographically-confirmed SRBDs (na 54) or appointments at either of two general pediatrics clinics (na 108). Parents completed a Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire which contained items under consideration for inclusion in desired scales. Results: Item reduction, based on data from a randomly selected 50% of the subjects (group A), produced a 22-item SRBD score that was strongly associated with diagnosis of an SRBD (P , 0:0001) in a logistic regression model that accounted for age and gender. Diagnosis was also strongly associated with subscores for snoring (four items, P , 0:0001), sleepiness (four items, Pa 0:0003), and behavior (six items, P , 0:0001) among group A subjects. The scales performed similarly well among group B subjects, and among subjects of different ages and gender. In group A and B subjects, respectively, a selected criterion SRBD score produced a sensitivity of 0.85 and 0.81; a specificity of 0.87 and 0.87; and a correct classification for 86 and 85% of subjects. The scales showed good internal consistency and, in a separate sample (na 21), good test-retest stability. Conclusions: These scales for childhood SRBDs, snoring, sleepiness, and behavior are valid and reliable instruments that can be used to identify SRBDs or associated symptom-constructs in clinical research when polysomnography is not feasible. q 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

956 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
20221
2021550
2020455
2019445
2018214
2017669