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The Dialogical Mind: Common Sense and Ethics

01 Sep 2016-

TL;DR: In this paper, Markova presents an ethics of dialogicality as an alternative to the narrow perspective of individualism and cognitivism that has traditionally dominated the field of social psychology.

AbstractDialogue has become a central theoretical concept in human and social sciences as well as in professions such as education, health, and psychotherapy. This 'dialogical turn' emphasises the importance of social relations and interaction to our behaviour and how we make sense of the world; hence the dialogical mind is the mind in interaction with others - with individuals, groups, institutions, and cultures in historical perspectives. Through a combination of rigorous theoretical work and empirical investigation, Markova presents an ethics of dialogicality as an alternative to the narrow perspective of individualism and cognitivism that has traditionally dominated the field of social psychology. The dialogical perspective, which focuses on interdependencies among the self and others, offers a powerful theoretical basis to comprehend, analyse, and discuss complex social issues. Markova considers the implications of dialogical epistemology both in daily life and in professional practices involving problems of communication, care, and therapy.

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI

35 citations

01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: This paper present a series of translations of Aquinas' treatises in new, state-of-the-art translations distinguished by their accuracy and use of clear and non-technical modern vocabulary.
Abstract: This series offers central philosophical treatises of Aquinas in new, state-of-the-art translations distinguished by their accuracy and use of clear and nontechnical modern vocabulary. Annotation and commentary accessible to undergraduates make the series an ideal vehicle for the study of Aquinas by readers approaching him from a variety of backgrounds and interests.

22 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a sociocultural model of imagination and its three dimensions, before building on it to account for how collectives imagine the future, arguing that imagination about the future is a central steering mechanism of individual and collective behaviours.
Abstract: This chapter examines how groups imagine their future. We present our sociocultural model of imagination and its three dimensions, before building on it to account for how collectives imagine the future. On this basis, we argue that imagination about the future is a central steering mechanism of individual and collective behaviours, and that it is often political because of its significance for groups. Accordingly, we introduce a new dimension for thinking about collective imagination of the future—the degree of centralization of imagining. Based on two examples, we suggest that a sociocultural psychology of collective imagination of the future should document instances of collective imagining, their developmental trajectories, and the social and political forces that hinder and promote particular imaginings.

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the importance of generalisation from dialogical single case studies is explained and justified, drawing on historical, theoretical and cultural knowledge, and explaining the meaning of generalization from case studies.
Abstract: Drawing on historical, theoretical and cultural knowledge, this introduction explains and justifies the importance of generalisation from dialogical single case studies. We clarify the meaning of d...

20 citations


Cites background or methods from "The Dialogical Mind: Common Sense a..."

  • ...As such, tensions between the holistic nature of the uniqueness and dynamics of ontologically interdependent Self–Other units, and the methodological tools with which such units are studied, remain (Grossen, 2010; Marková, 2016)....

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  • ...Other units, and the methodological tools with which such units are studied, remain (Grossen, 2010; Marková, 2016)....

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  • ...…to study dynamic and ethical interdependent units does not approach the construction of their case using a method of sampling that treats the Self as something other than an ethical being from whose unique communication with Others something important can be known (see also Marková, 2016)....

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References
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Book
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TL;DR: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions as discussed by the authors is a seminal work in the history of science and philosophy of science, and it has been widely cited as a major source of inspiration for the present generation of scientists.
Abstract: A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were-and still are. "The Structure of Scientific Revolutions" is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of science. And fifty years later, it still has many lessons to teach. With "The Structure of Scientific Revolutions", Kuhn challenged long-standing linear notions of scientific progress, arguing that transformative ideas don't arise from the day-to-day, gradual process of experimentation and data accumulation, but that revolutions in science, those breakthrough moments that disrupt accepted thinking and offer unanticipated ideas, occur outside of "normal science," as he called it. Though Kuhn was writing when physics ruled the sciences, his ideas on how scientific revolutions bring order to the anomalies that amass over time in research experiments are still instructive in our biotech age. This new edition of Kuhn's essential work in the history of science includes an insightful introductory essay by Ian Hacking that clarifies terms popularized by Kuhn, including paradigm and incommensurability, and applies Kuhn's ideas to the science of today. Usefully keyed to the separate sections of the book, Hacking's essay provides important background information as well as a contemporary context. Newly designed, with an expanded index, this edition will be eagerly welcomed by the next generation of readers seeking to understand the history of our perspectives on science.

36,768 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

34,369 citations

Book Chapter
28 Apr 2004
TL;DR: The comprehensive and accessible nature of this collection will make it an essential and lasting handbook for researchers and students studying organizations.
Abstract: Essential Guide to Qualitative Methods in Organizational Research is an excellent resource for students and researchers in the areas of organization studies, management research and organizational psychology, bringing together in one volume the range of methods available for undertaking qualitative data collection and analysis. The volume includes 30 chapters, each focusing on a specific technique. The chapters cover traditional research methods, analysis techniques, and interventions as well as the latest developments in the field. Each chapter reviews how the method has been used in organizational research, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using the method, and presents a case study example of the method in use. A list of further reading is supplied for those requiring additional information about a given method. The comprehensive and accessible nature of this collection will make it an essential and lasting handbook for researchers and students studying organizations.

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Book
01 Jan 1968
TL;DR: Erikson as mentioned in this paper describes a process that is located both in the core of the individual and in the inner space of the communal culture, and discusses the connection between individual struggles and social order.
Abstract: Identity, Erikson writes, is an unfathomable as it is all-pervasive. It deals with a process that is located both in the core of the individual and in the core of the communal culture. As the culture changes, new kinds of identity questions arise-Erikson comments, for example, on issues of social protest and changing gender roles that were particular to the 1960s. Representing two decades of groundbreaking work, the essays are not so much a systematic formulation of theory as an evolving report that is both clinical and theoretical. The subjects range from "creative confusion" in two famous lives-the dramatist George Bernard Shaw and the philosopher William James-to the connection between individual struggles and social order. "Race and the Wider Identity" and the controversial "Womanhood and the Inner Space" are included in the collection.

14,881 citations

Book
01 Jan 1958
TL;DR: The psychology of interpersonal relations as mentioned in this paper, The psychology in interpersonal relations, The Psychology of interpersonal relationships, کتابخانه دیجیتال و فن اطلاعات دانشگاه امام صادق(ع)
Abstract: The psychology of interpersonal relations , The psychology of interpersonal relations , کتابخانه دیجیتال و فن آوری اطلاعات دانشگاه امام صادق(ع)

14,774 citations