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Institution

United States Department of Veterans Affairs

GovernmentWashington D.C., District of Columbia, United States
About: United States Department of Veterans Affairs is a government organization based out in Washington D.C., District of Columbia, United States. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Veterans Affairs. The organization has 61475 authors who have published 70990 publications receiving 3291429 citations. The organization is also known as: VA & Veterans Affairs Department.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016 (GBD 2016) provides a comprehensive assessment of prevalence, incidence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) for 328 causes in 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2016.
Abstract: Summary Background As mortality rates decline, life expectancy increases, and populations age, non-fatal outcomes of diseases and injuries are becoming a larger component of the global burden of disease. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016 (GBD 2016) provides a comprehensive assessment of prevalence, incidence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) for 328 causes in 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2016. Methods We estimated prevalence and incidence for 328 diseases and injuries and 2982 sequelae, their non-fatal consequences. We used DisMod-MR 2.1, a Bayesian meta-regression tool, as the main method of estimation, ensuring consistency between incidence, prevalence, remission, and cause of death rates for each condition. For some causes, we used alternative modelling strategies if incidence or prevalence needed to be derived from other data. YLDs were estimated as the product of prevalence and a disability weight for all mutually exclusive sequelae, corrected for comorbidity and aggregated to cause level. We updated the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a summary indicator of income per capita, years of schooling, and total fertility rate. GBD 2016 complies with the Guidelines for Accurate and Transparent Health Estimates Reporting (GATHER). Findings Globally, low back pain, migraine, age-related and other hearing loss, iron-deficiency anaemia, and major depressive disorder were the five leading causes of YLDs in 2016, contributing 57·6 million (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 40·8–75·9 million [7·2%, 6·0–8·3]), 45·1 million (29·0–62·8 million [5·6%, 4·0–7·2]), 36·3 million (25·3–50·9 million [4·5%, 3·8–5·3]), 34·7 million (23·0–49·6 million [4·3%, 3·5–5·2]), and 34·1 million (23·5–46·0 million [4·2%, 3·2–5·3]) of total YLDs, respectively. Age-standardised rates of YLDs for all causes combined decreased between 1990 and 2016 by 2·7% (95% UI 2·3–3·1). Despite mostly stagnant age-standardised rates, the absolute number of YLDs from non-communicable diseases has been growing rapidly across all SDI quintiles, partly because of population growth, but also the ageing of populations. The largest absolute increases in total numbers of YLDs globally were between the ages of 40 and 69 years. Age-standardised YLD rates for all conditions combined were 10·4% (95% UI 9·0–11·8) higher in women than in men. Iron-deficiency anaemia, migraine, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, major depressive disorder, anxiety, and all musculoskeletal disorders apart from gout were the main conditions contributing to higher YLD rates in women. Men had higher age-standardised rates of substance use disorders, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancers, and all injuries apart from sexual violence. Globally, we noted much less geographical variation in disability than has been documented for premature mortality. In 2016, there was a less than two times difference in age-standardised YLD rates for all causes between the location with the lowest rate (China, 9201 YLDs per 100 000, 95% UI 6862–11943) and highest rate (Yemen, 14 774 YLDs per 100 000, 11 018–19 228). Interpretation The decrease in death rates since 1990 for most causes has not been matched by a similar decline in age-standardised YLD rates. For many large causes, YLD rates have either been stagnant or have increased for some causes, such as diabetes. As populations are ageing, and the prevalence of disabling disease generally increases steeply with age, health systems will face increasing demand for services that are generally costlier than the interventions that have led to declines in mortality in childhood or for the major causes of mortality in adults. Up-to-date information about the trends of disease and how this varies between countries is essential to plan for an adequate health-system response. Funding Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health.

10,401 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Ludmil B. Alexandrov1, Serena Nik-Zainal2, Serena Nik-Zainal3, David C. Wedge1, Samuel Aparicio4, Sam Behjati5, Sam Behjati1, Andrew V. Biankin, Graham R. Bignell1, Niccolo Bolli5, Niccolo Bolli1, Åke Borg2, Anne Lise Børresen-Dale6, Anne Lise Børresen-Dale7, Sandrine Boyault8, Birgit Burkhardt8, Adam Butler1, Carlos Caldas9, Helen Davies1, Christine Desmedt, Roland Eils5, Jorunn E. Eyfjord10, John A. Foekens11, Mel Greaves12, Fumie Hosoda13, Barbara Hutter5, Tomislav Ilicic1, Sandrine Imbeaud14, Sandrine Imbeaud15, Marcin Imielinsk14, Natalie Jäger5, David T. W. Jones16, David T. Jones1, Stian Knappskog17, Stian Knappskog11, Marcel Kool11, Sunil R. Lakhani18, Carlos López-Otín18, Sancha Martin1, Nikhil C. Munshi19, Nikhil C. Munshi20, Hiromi Nakamura13, Paul A. Northcott16, Marina Pajic21, Elli Papaemmanuil1, Angelo Paradiso22, John V. Pearson23, Xose S. Puente18, Keiran Raine1, Manasa Ramakrishna1, Andrea L. Richardson22, Andrea L. Richardson20, Julia Richter22, Philip Rosenstiel22, Matthias Schlesner5, Ton N. Schumacher24, Paul N. Span25, Jon W. Teague1, Yasushi Totoki13, Andrew Tutt24, Rafael Valdés-Mas18, Marit M. van Buuren25, Laura van ’t Veer26, Anne Vincent-Salomon27, Nicola Waddell23, Lucy R. Yates1, Icgc PedBrain24, Jessica Zucman-Rossi14, Jessica Zucman-Rossi15, P. Andrew Futreal1, Ultan McDermott1, Peter Lichter24, Matthew Meyerson14, Matthew Meyerson20, Sean M. Grimmond23, Reiner Siebert22, Elias Campo28, Tatsuhiro Shibata13, Stefan M. Pfister11, Stefan M. Pfister16, Peter J. Campbell3, Peter J. Campbell29, Peter J. Campbell30, Michael R. Stratton31, Michael R. Stratton3 
22 Aug 2013-Nature
TL;DR: It is shown that hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, ‘kataegis’, is found in many cancer types, and this results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer.
Abstract: All cancers are caused by somatic mutations; however, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single cancer class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, 'kataegis', is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer, with potential implications for understanding of cancer aetiology, prevention and therapy.

7,904 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown here that miRNAs are present in human plasma in a remarkably stable form that is protected from endogenous RNase activity and established the measurement of tumor-derived mi RNAs in serum or plasma as an important approach for the blood-based detection of human cancer.
Abstract: Improved approaches for the detection of common epithelial malignancies are urgently needed to reduce the worldwide morbidity and mortality caused by cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (≈22 nt) regulatory RNAs that are frequently dysregulated in cancer and have shown promise as tissue-based markers for cancer classification and prognostication. We show here that miRNAs are present in human plasma in a remarkably stable form that is protected from endogenous RNase activity. miRNAs originating from human prostate cancer xenografts enter the circulation, are readily measured in plasma, and can robustly distinguish xenografted mice from controls. This concept extends to cancer in humans, where serum levels of miR-141 (a miRNA expressed in prostate cancer) can distinguish patients with prostate cancer from healthy controls. Our results establish the measurement of tumor-derived miRNAs in serum or plasma as an important approach for the blood-based detection of human cancer.

7,296 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Clotilde Théry1, Kenneth W. Witwer2, Elena Aikawa3, María José Alcaraz4  +414 moreInstitutions (209)
TL;DR: The MISEV2018 guidelines include tables and outlines of suggested protocols and steps to follow to document specific EV-associated functional activities, and a checklist is provided with summaries of key points.
Abstract: The last decade has seen a sharp increase in the number of scientific publications describing physiological and pathological functions of extracellular vesicles (EVs), a collective term covering various subtypes of cell-released, membranous structures, called exosomes, microvesicles, microparticles, ectosomes, oncosomes, apoptotic bodies, and many other names. However, specific issues arise when working with these entities, whose size and amount often make them difficult to obtain as relatively pure preparations, and to characterize properly. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) proposed Minimal Information for Studies of Extracellular Vesicles (“MISEV”) guidelines for the field in 2014. We now update these “MISEV2014” guidelines based on evolution of the collective knowledge in the last four years. An important point to consider is that ascribing a specific function to EVs in general, or to subtypes of EVs, requires reporting of specific information beyond mere description of function in a crude, potentially contaminated, and heterogeneous preparation. For example, claims that exosomes are endowed with exquisite and specific activities remain difficult to support experimentally, given our still limited knowledge of their specific molecular machineries of biogenesis and release, as compared with other biophysically similar EVs. The MISEV2018 guidelines include tables and outlines of suggested protocols and steps to follow to document specific EV-associated functional activities. Finally, a checklist is provided with summaries of key points.

5,988 citations


Authors

Showing all 61503 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Robert J. Lefkowitz214860147995
Rob Knight2011061253207
Irving L. Weissman2011141172504
Ronald M. Evans199708166722
Robert M. Califf1961561167961
Eric J. Topol1931373151025
Nicholas G. Martin1921770161952
Stephen V. Faraone1881427140298
Gordon B. Mills1871273186451
Scott M. Grundy187841231821
Paul G. Richardson1831533155912
Dennis S. Charney179802122408
Bruce M. Spiegelman179434158009
Kenneth C. Anderson1781138126072
Kenneth S. Kendler1771327142251
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20239
202253
20211,753
20201,641
20191,515
20181,448