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Journal ArticleDOI

Antibacterial activity of some salt marsh halophytes and mangrove plants against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

01 Jan 2009-World Journal of Microbiology & Biotechnology (Springer Netherlands)-Vol. 25, Iss: 1, pp 155-160

TL;DR: The antibacterial activity of aqueous and methanol extracts of leaves/shoots of five salt marsh halophytes and six mangroves was studied against methicillin resistant, clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and further separation of active principle from the potent mangrove plant will be useful for the control of drug resistant strains.

AbstractThe antibacterial activity of aqueous and methanol extracts of leaves/shoots of five salt marsh halophytes and six mangroves was studied against methicillin resistant, clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus. There was a clear comparability between the salt marsh halophytes and mangroves in their antibacterial action. The mangrove plants possessed higher antibacterial potency than the salt marsh halophytes. The highest activity was recorded with the methanol extract of Excoecaria agallocha followed by the methanol extracts of Aegiceras corniculatum, Lumnitzera racemosa and Ceriops decandra. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranged from 0.125 to 4 mg/mL and 1 to 16 mg/mL for methanol and aqueous extracts, respectively. Further separation of active principle from the potent mangrove plant will be useful for the control of drug resistant strains of S. aureus.

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The current study elucidates that the synthesized AgNPs were efficient against the bacterial strains tested and showed an obvious superiority of the antibacterial potency of BAgNPs compared to the CAgNPs as denoted by the zone of inhibition (ZoI).
Abstract: The focus of the study is to compare the antibacterial efficacy of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) fabricated by exploiting biological (a mangrove plant, Rhizophora apiculata) and chemical means (Glucose). The synthesized nanoparticles were characterised using UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry (UV-vis), Fourier transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (BAgNPs) were observed at 423 nm with particle sizes of 19-42 nm. The chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles (CAgNPs) showed a maximum peak at 422 nm with particle sizes of 13-19 nm. An obvious superiority of the antibacterial potency of BAgNPs compared to the CAgNPs as denoted by the zone of inhibition (ZoI) was noted when the nanoparticles were treated against seven different Microbial Type Culture Collection (MTCC) strains. The current study therefore elucidates that the synthesized AgNPs were efficient against the bacterial strains tested.

105 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Recent investigations on the biological activities of extracts and phytochemicals identified from mangroves and their associates as antimicrobial, antiviral, antioxidant, anticancer and many other properties like antiproliferative, insecticidal, antimalarial, antifeedant, central nervous system depressant and anti-plasmodial are examined.
Abstract: Mangrove forests are salt tolerant plants confined to the coastal areas and occupy only 5% of the total forest areas of the world. These are the most hostile environment with fluctuating tidal and saline regime and a limited plant species can survive under such condition. Nevertheless, these plants are most valuable resources and provide economic and ecological benefits to the coastal people. Several mangrove species have been used in traditional medicine or have few applications as insecticide and pesticide. Mangroves are biochemically unique, producing wide array of natural products with unique bioactivity. They possess active metabolites with some novel chemical structures which belong to diverse chemical classes such as alkaloids, phenol, steroids, terpenoids, tannins, etc. The present review examines recent investigations on the biological activities of extracts and phytochemicals identified from mangroves and their associates as antimicrobial, antiviral, antioxidant, anticancer and many other properties like antiproliferative, insecticidal, antimalarial, antifeedant, central nervous system depressant and anti-plasmodial etc. The present article also emphasizes and creates an awareness of potential mangroves and their associates as a source of novel medicines, agrochemicals and source of many biologically active compounds.

71 citations


Cites background from "Antibacterial activity of some salt..."

  • ...…2001; Konishi et al. 2003; Kathiresan et al. 2006; Subhan et al. 2008a, 2008b; Kumar et al. 2009; Patra et al. 2009a; Patra et al. 2009b; Wang et al. 2009; Chandrasekaran et al. 2009; Abeysinghe 2010 biologically active forms, but others occur as inactive precursors and are activated in response…...

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  • ...…2010); 2-nitro4-(20-nitroethenyl phenol) from leaves of S. acida; alkanes (46.7–97.9% wax) and triterpenoids (53.3% wax) from leaves of Rhizophora species; and iridoid glycosides from leaves of Avicennia officinalis and A. germinans (Vadlapudi and Naidu 2009a; Chandrasekaran et al. 2009) (Table 2)....

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  • ...…Glucosyringic acid, Tachioside, Isotachioside Wangensteen et al. 2009a 12 Sonneratia acida 2-nitro-4-(20-nitroethenyl phenol) Vadlapudi and Naidu 2009a; Chandrasekaran et al. 2009 13 Xylocarpus granatum Xyloccensin, Procyanidin B3, Catechin, Epicatechin, Procyanidin B1, Procyanidin…...

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  • ...…been provided by a number of review and research articles (Bandaranayake 2002; Kathiresan et al. 2006; Pattanaik et al. 2008; Bose and Bose 2008; Jun et al. 2008; Singh et al. 2009; Manilal et al. 2009; Chandrasekaran et al. 2009; Vadlapudi and Naidu 2009a; Patra et al. 2009a, b; Wang et al. 2009)....

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  • ...…(Telugu) Bark-diabetes Ashihara et al. 2003 19 Lumnitzera racemosa Tunda (Oriya), Kripa (Bengali), Tipparathai (Tamil) Stem-itches and herpes, asthma, diabetes, snake bite Antiviral Bamroongrugsa 1999; Ashihara et al. 2003; Vadlapudi and Naidu 2009b; Chandrasekaran et al. 2009; Abeysinghe 2010 20....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The antibacterial activity of the leaves and bark of mangrove plants, Avicennia marina, A. racemosa and A. marina gave the best inhibition for bacterial species, they were used for further investigations and revealed that leaf and bark contained alkaloids, steroids, triterpenoids and flavonoids.
Abstract: The antibacterial activity of the leaves and bark of mangrove plants, Avicennia marina, A. officinalis, Bruguiera sexangula, Exoecaria agallocha, Lumnitzera racemosa, and Rhizophora apiculata was evaluated against antibiotic resistant pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus sp. Soxhlet extracts of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, ethanol and water were prepared and evaluated the antibacterial activity using agar diffusion method. Most of the plant extracts showed promising antibacterial activity against both bacterial species. However, higher antibacterial activity was observed for Staphylococcus aureus than Proteus sp. The highest antibacterial activity was shown by ethyl acetate of mature leaf extracts of E. agallocha for Staphylococcus aureus. All ethyl acetate extracts showed higher inhibition against S. aureus while some extracts of chloroform, ethyl acetate and ethanol gave inhibition against Proteus sp. None of the petroleum ether and aqueous extracts showed inhibition against Proteus sp. All fresh plant materials did also show more antibacterial activity against both bacterial strains than did dried plant extracts. Antibacterial activity of fresh and dried plant materials reduced for both bacterial strains with time after extraction. Since L. racemosa and A. marina gave the best inhibition for bacterial species, they were used for further investigations. Charcoal treated plant extracts of L. racemosa and A. marina were able to inhibit both bacterial strains more than those of untreated plant extracts. Phytochemical screening of mature leaf, bark of L. racemosa and leaf extracts of A. marina has been carried out and revealed that leaf and bark contained alkaloids, steroids, triterpenoids and flavonoids. None of the above extracts indicate the presence of saponins and cardiac glycosides. Separated bands of extracts by TLC analysis showed antibacterial activity against S. aureus.

69 citations


Cites background from "Antibacterial activity of some salt..."

  • ...Extracts from different mangrove plants and mangrove associates are active against human and plant pathogens[14]....

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  • ...Indian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 168 March - April 2010 antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal properties[13-15]....

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  • ...According to preliminary study and studies of other people[14], it has been recorded that, a number of mangrove plant extracts of methanol, ethanol and aqueous showed antibacterial activity against pathogenic isolates as well as antibiotic resistant bacteria....

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  • ...A number of mangroves and associates contain poisonous substances, which also show biological activities such as antifungal, antibacterial, antifeedant, molluscicidal, and pesticidal properties[10,14]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of methanolic, ethanolic and chloroform crude extract of leaves and barks of Bruguiera gymnorrhiza were investigated.
Abstract: In the present work, the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of methanolic, ethanolic and chloroform crude extract of leaves and barks of Bruguiera gymnorrhiza were investigated. The antioxidant activity of the crude extracts were evaluated using the enzymatic and non enzymatic methods namely superoxide dismutase determination, reducing power assay and 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazil free radical scavenging assays. Folin-ciocalteu reagent method was used to estimate the amount of total phenolic compounds of the extracts. Ethanol extract of barks showed the best result in all antioxidant assays which was positively co-related with the total phenolic contents. There was no significant difference between the IC 50 value of ethanol extract of bark and the ascorbic acid. Escherichia coli , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus were used as the test pathogenic bacteria in this study. Both ethanol and methanol extracts could inhibit the growth of all pathogenic bacteria while chloroform extract of leaves showed no activity against any bacteria. Antimicrobial effect of ethanol extract of barks was higher than all other extracts.

51 citations


Cites background from "Antibacterial activity of some salt..."

  • ...Promising antibacterial activity of ethyl acetate extract of Avicennia marina mature leaves (Abeysinghe and Wanigatunge, 2006), methanol extract of Excoecaria agallocha leaves and shoots (Chandrasekaran et al., 2009) and antifungal activity of methanol extract of Exoecaria agallocha and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza trunks (Kazuhiko, 2002) are some other...

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  • ...…acetate extract of Avicennia marina mature leaves (Abeysinghe and Wanigatunge, 2006), methanol extract of Excoecaria agallocha leaves and shoots (Chandrasekaran et al., 2009) and antifungal activity of methanol extract of Exoecaria agallocha and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza trunks (Kazuhiko, 2002) are…...

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The obtained results are considered sufficient for further study to isolate the compounds responsible for the activity and suggesting the possibility of finding potent antibacterial agents from L. littorea extracts.
Abstract: Objective To investigate the antimicrobial activities of n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of the leaves of Lumnitzera littorea (L. littorea) against six human pathogenic microbes.

50 citations


Cites background from "Antibacterial activity of some salt..."

  • ...The extracts from different mangrove plants and mangrove associates have been reported to possess inhibition action against human and plant pathogens[13-22]....

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