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Institution

Laboratory of Molecular Biology

FacilityCambridge, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
About: Laboratory of Molecular Biology is a facility organization based out in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Gene & RNA. The organization has 19395 authors who have published 24236 publications receiving 2101480 citations.
Topics: Gene, RNA, DNA, Population, Transcription (biology)


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
15 Aug 1970-Nature
TL;DR: Using an improved method of gel electrophoresis, many hitherto unknown proteins have been found in bacteriophage T4 and some of these have been identified with specific gene products.
Abstract: Using an improved method of gel electrophoresis, many hitherto unknown proteins have been found in bacteriophage T4 and some of these have been identified with specific gene products. Four major components of the head are cleaved during the process of assembly, apparently after the precursor proteins have assembled into some large intermediate structure.

232,912 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
07 Aug 1975-Nature
TL;DR: The derivation of a number of tissue culture cell lines which secrete anti-sheep red blood cell (SRBC) antibodies is described here, made by fusion of a mouse myeloma and mouse spleen cells from an immunised donor.
Abstract: THE manufacture of predefined specific antibodies by means of permanent tissue culture cell lines is of general interest. There are at present a considerable number of permanent cultures of myeloma cells1,2 and screening procedures have been used to reveal antibody activity in some of them. This, however, is not a satisfactory source of monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity. We describe here the derivation of a number of tissue culture cell lines which secrete anti-sheep red blood cell (SRBC) antibodies. The cell lines are made by fusion of a mouse myeloma and mouse spleen cells from an immunised donor. To understand the expression and interactions of the Ig chains from the parental lines, fusion experiments between two known mouse myeloma lines were carried out.

19,053 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 1974-Genetics
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe methods for the isolation, complementation and mapping of mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans, a small free-living nematode worm.
Abstract: Methods are described for the isolation, complementation and mapping of mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans, a small free-living nematode worm. About 300 EMS-induced mutants affecting behavior and morphology have been characterized and about one hundred genes have been defined. Mutations in 77 of these alter the movement of the animal. Estimates of the induced mutation frequency of both the visible mutants and X chromosome lethals suggests that, just as in Drosophila, the genetic units in C. elegans are large.

13,247 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An overview of the CCP4 software suite for macromolecular crystallography is given.
Abstract: The CCP4 (Collaborative Computational Project, Number 4) software suite is a collection of programs and associated data and software libraries which can be used for macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography. The suite is designed to be flexible, allowing users a number of methods of achieving their aims. The programs are from a wide variety of sources but are connected by a common infrastructure provided by standard file formats, data objects and graphical interfaces. Structure solution by macromolecular crystallo­graphy is becoming increasingly automated and the CCP4 suite includes several automation pipelines. After giving a brief description of the evolution of CCP4 over the last 30 years, an overview of the current suite is given. While detailed descriptions are given in the accompanying articles, here it is shown how the individual programs contribute to a complete software package.

11,023 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
09 Apr 1981
TL;DR: The complete sequence of the 16,569-base pair human mitochondrial genome is presented and shows extreme economy in that the genes have none or only a few noncoding bases between them, and in many cases the termination codons are not coded in the DNA but are created post-transcriptionally by polyadenylation of the mRNAs.
Abstract: The complete sequence of the 16,569-base pair human mitochondrial genome is presented. The genes for the 12S and 16S rRNAs, 22 tRNAs, cytochrome c oxidase subunits I, II and III, ATPase subunit 6, cytochrome b and eight other predicted protein coding genes have been located. The sequence shows extreme economy in that the genes have none or only a few noncoding bases between them, and in many cases the termination codons are not coded in the DNA but are created post-transcriptionally by polyadenylation of the mRNAs.

8,783 citations


Authors

Showing all 19431 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Robert J. Lefkowitz214860147995
Ronald M. Evans199708166722
Tony Hunter175593124726
Marc G. Caron17367499802
Mark Gerstein168751149578
Timothy A. Springer167669122421
Harvey F. Lodish165782101124
Ira Pastan1601286110069
Bruce N. Ames158506129010
Philip Cohen154555110856
Gerald M. Rubin152382115248
Ashok Kumar1515654164086
Kim Nasmyth14229459231
Kenneth M. Yamada13944672136
Harold E. Varmus13749676320
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20239
202265
20211,222
20201,165
20191,082
2018945