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Institution

Science for Life Laboratory

FacilityStockholm, Sweden
About: Science for Life Laboratory is a(n) facility organization based out in Stockholm, Sweden. It is known for research contribution in the topic(s): Population & Genome. The organization has 2811 authors who have published 5180 publication(s) receiving 231686 citation(s). The organization is also known as: SciLifeLab.
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Journal ArticleDOI
Manfred Grabherr1, Brian J. Haas1, Moran Yassour1, Moran Yassour2  +19 moreInstitutions (4)
TL;DR: The Trinity method for de novo assembly of full-length transcripts and evaluate it on samples from fission yeast, mouse and whitefly, whose reference genome is not yet available, providing a unified solution for transcriptome reconstruction in any sample.
Abstract: Massively parallel sequencing of cDNA has enabled deep and efficient probing of transcriptomes. Current approaches for transcript reconstruction from such data often rely on aligning reads to a reference genome, and are thus unsuitable for samples with a partial or missing reference genome. Here we present the Trinity method for de novo assembly of full-length transcripts and evaluate it on samples from fission yeast, mouse and whitefly, whose reference genome is not yet available. By efficiently constructing and analyzing sets of de Bruijn graphs, Trinity fully reconstructs a large fraction of transcripts, including alternatively spliced isoforms and transcripts from recently duplicated genes. Compared with other de novo transcriptome assemblers, Trinity recovers more full-length transcripts across a broad range of expression levels, with a sensitivity similar to methods that rely on genome alignments. Our approach provides a unified solution for transcriptome reconstruction in any sample, especially in the absence of a reference genome.

12,649 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: SignalP 4.0 was the best signal-peptide predictor for all three organism types but was not in all cases as good as SignalP 3.0 according to cleavage-site sensitivity or signal- peptide correlation when there are no transmembrane proteins present.
Abstract: We benchmarked SignalP 4.0 against SignalP 3.0 and ten other signal peptide prediction algorithms (Fig. 1). We compared prediction performance using the Matthews correlation coefficient16, for which each sequence was counted as a true or false positive or negative. To test SignalP 4.0 performance, we did not use data that had been used in training the networks or selecting the optimal architecture, and the test data did not contain homologs to the training and optimization data (Supplementary Methods). The test set for SignalP 3.0 was also independent of the training set because we removed sequences used to construct SignalP 3.0 and their homologs from the benchmark data. For other algorithms more recent than SignalP 3.0, the benchmark data may include data used to train the methods, possibly leading to slight overestimations of their performance. Our results show that SignalP 4.0 was the best signal-peptide predictor for all three organism types (Fig. 1). This comes at a price, however, because SignalP 4.0 was not in all cases as good as SignalP 3.0 according to cleavage-site sensitivity or signal-peptide correlation when there are no transmembrane proteins present (Supplementary Results). An ideal method would have the best SignalP 4.0: discriminating signal peptides from transmembrane regions

7,784 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
23 Jan 2015-Science
Abstract: Resolving the molecular details of proteome variation in the different tissues and organs of the human body will greatly increase our knowledge of human biology and disease. Here, we present a map of the human tissue proteome based on an integrated omics approach that involves quantitative transcriptomics at the tissue and organ level, combined with tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry, to achieve spatial localization of proteins down to the single-cell level. Our tissue-based analysis detected more than 90% of the putative protein-coding genes. We used this approach to explore the human secretome, the membrane proteome, the druggable proteome, the cancer proteome, and the metabolic functions in 32 different tissues and organs. All the data are integrated in an interactive Web-based database that allows exploration of individual proteins, as well as navigation of global expression patterns, in all major tissues and organs in the human body.

6,953 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Sander Pronk1, Szilárd Páll1, Szilárd Páll2, Roland Schulz3  +17 moreInstitutions (7)
TL;DR: A range of new simulation algorithms and features developed during the past 4 years are presented, leading up to the GROMACS 4.5 software package, which provides extremely high performance and cost efficiency for high-throughput as well as massively parallel simulations.
Abstract: Motivation: Molecular simulation has historically been a low-throughput technique, but faster computers and increasing amounts of genomic and structural data are changing this by enabling large-scale automated simulation of, for instance, many conformers or mutants of biomolecules with or without a range of ligands. At the same time, advances in performance and scaling now make it possible to model complex biomolecular interaction and function in a manner directly testable by experiment. These applications share a need for fast and efficient software that can be deployed on massive scale in clusters, web servers, distributed computing or cloud resources. Results: Here, we present a range of new simulation algorithms and features developed during the past 4 years, leading up to the GROMACS 4.5 software package. The software now automatically handles wide classes of biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, and comes with all commonly used force fields for these molecules built-in. GROMACS supports several implicit solvent models, as well as new free-energy algorithms, and the software now uses multithreading for efficient parallelization even on low-end systems, including windows-based workstations. Together with hand-tuned assembly kernels and state-of-the-art parallelization, this provides extremely high performance and cost efficiency for high-throughput as well as massively parallel simulations. Availability: GROMACS is an open source and free software available from http://www.gromacs.org. Contact: erik.lindahl@scilifelab.se Supplementary information:Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

5,130 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Brian J. Haas1, Alexie Papanicolaou2, Moran Yassour3, Moran Yassour4  +21 moreInstitutions (16)
TL;DR: This protocol provides a workflow for genome-independent transcriptome analysis leveraging the Trinity platform and presents Trinity-supported companion utilities for downstream applications, including RSEM for transcript abundance estimation, R/Bioconductor packages for identifying differentially expressed transcripts across samples and approaches to identify protein-coding genes.
Abstract: De novo assembly of RNA-seq data enables researchers to study transcriptomes without the need for a genome sequence; this approach can be usefully applied, for instance, in research on 'non-model organisms' of ecological and evolutionary importance, cancer samples or the microbiome. In this protocol we describe the use of the Trinity platform for de novo transcriptome assembly from RNA-seq data in non-model organisms. We also present Trinity-supported companion utilities for downstream applications, including RSEM for transcript abundance estimation, R/Bioconductor packages for identifying differentially expressed transcripts across samples and approaches to identify protein-coding genes. In the procedure, we provide a workflow for genome-independent transcriptome analysis leveraging the Trinity platform. The software, documentation and demonstrations are freely available from http://trinityrnaseq.sourceforge.net. The run time of this protocol is highly dependent on the size and complexity of data to be analyzed. The example data set analyzed in the procedure detailed herein can be processed in less than 5 h.

5,056 citations


Authors

Showing all 2811 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
André G. Uitterlinden1991229156747
George M. Church172900120514
Jens Nielsen1491752104005
Vijay K. Kuchroo14452586936
Kohei Miyazono13551568706
Carl-Henrik Heldin13152067528
David P. Lane12956890787
Erik Ingelsson12453885407
Elisabetta Dejana12243048254
Mathias Uhlén11786168387
Clive Ballard11773661663
Christer Betsholtz10435756771
Kjell Öberg10251838262
Peter ten Dijke10128640776
Ulf Gyllensten10036859219
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20224
2021792
2020687
2019642
2018599
2017541