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Institution

Agro ParisTech

EducationParis, France
About: Agro ParisTech is a education organization based out in Paris, France. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Soil water. The organization has 3670 authors who have published 5532 publications receiving 208607 citations.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The elucidation ofMYB protein function and regulation that is possible in Arabidopsis will provide the foundation for predicting the contributions of MYB proteins to the biology of plants in general.

3,542 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors proposed a general standardised and practical static digestion method based on physiologically relevant conditions that can be applied for various endpoints, which may be amended to accommodate further specific requirements.
Abstract: Simulated gastro-intestinal digestion is widely employed in many fields of food and nutritional sciences, as conducting human trials are often costly, resource intensive, and ethically disputable. As a consequence, in vitro alternatives that determine endpoints such as the bioaccessibility of nutrients and non-nutrients or the digestibility of macronutrients (e.g. lipids, proteins and carbohydrates) are used for screening and building new hypotheses. Various digestion models have been proposed, often impeding the possibility to compare results across research teams. For example, a large variety of enzymes from different sources such as of porcine, rabbit or human origin have been used, differing in their activity and characterization. Differences in pH, mineral type, ionic strength and digestion time, which alter enzyme activity and other phenomena, may also considerably alter results. Other parameters such as the presence of phospholipids, individual enzymes such as gastric lipase and digestive emulsifiers vs. their mixtures (e.g. pancreatin and bile salts), and the ratio of food bolus to digestive fluids, have also been discussed at length. In the present consensus paper, within the COST Infogest network, we propose a general standardised and practical static digestion method based on physiologically relevant conditions that can be applied for various endpoints, which may be amended to accommodate further specific requirements. A frameset of parameters including the oral, gastric and small intestinal digestion are outlined and their relevance discussed in relation to available in vivo data and enzymes. This consensus paper will give a detailed protocol and a line-by-line, guidance, recommendations and justifications but also limitation of the proposed model. This harmonised static, in vitro digestion method for food should aid the production of more comparable data in the future.

3,380 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
22 Nov 2013-Science
TL;DR: It is demonstrated that cyclophosphamide alters the composition of microbiota in the small intestine and induces the translocation of selected species of Gram-positive bacteria into secondary lymphoid organs, which suggests that the gut microbiota help shape the anticancer immune response.
Abstract: Cyclophosphamide is one of several clinically important cancer drugs whose therapeutic efficacy is due in part to their ability to stimulate antitumor immune responses. Studying mouse models, we demonstrate that cyclophosphamide alters the composition of microbiota in the small intestine and induces the translocation of selected species of Gram-positive bacteria into secondary lymphoid organs. There, these bacteria stimulate the generation of a specific subset of "pathogenic" T helper 17 (pT(H)17) cells and memory T(H)1 immune responses. Tumor-bearing mice that were germ-free or that had been treated with antibiotics to kill Gram-positive bacteria showed a reduction in pT(H)17 responses, and their tumors were resistant to cyclophosphamide. Adoptive transfer of pT(H)17 cells partially restored the antitumor efficacy of cyclophosphamide. These results suggest that the gut microbiota help shape the anticancer immune response.

1,487 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 2016-Gut
TL;DR: A. muciniphila is associated with a healthier metabolic status and better clinical outcomes after CR in overweight/obese adults, and the interaction between gut microbiota ecology and A. muc iniphila warrants further investigation.
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes differ from lean and healthy individuals in their abundance of certain gut microbial species and microbial gene richness Abundance of Akkermansia muciniphila, a mucin-degrading bacterium, has been inversely associated with body fat mass and glucose intolerance in mice, but more evidence is needed in humans The impact of diet and weight loss on this bacterial species is unknown Our objective was to evaluate the association between faecal A muciniphila abundance, faecal microbiome gene richness, diet, host characteristics, and their changes after calorie restriction (CR) DESIGN: The intervention consisted of a 6-week CR period followed by a 6-week weight stabilisation diet in overweight and obese adults (N=49, including 41 women) Faecal A muciniphila abundance, faecal microbial gene richness, diet and bioclinical parameters were measured at baseline and after CR and weight stabilisation RESULTS: At baseline A muciniphila was inversely related to fasting glucose, waist-to-hip ratio and subcutaneous adipocyte diameter Subjects with higher gene richness and A muciniphila abundance exhibited the healthiest metabolic status, particularly in fasting plasma glucose, plasma triglycerides and body fat distribution Individuals with higher baseline A muciniphila displayed greater improvement in insulin sensitivity markers and other clinical parameters after CR These participants also experienced a reduction in A muciniphila abundance, but it remained significantly higher than in individuals with lower baseline abundance A muciniphila was associated with microbial species known to be related to health CONCLUSIONS: A muciniphila is associated with a healthier metabolic status and better clinical outcomes after CR in overweight/obese adults The interaction between gut microbiota ecology and A muciniphila warrants further investigation TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01314690

1,224 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Martien A. M. Groenen1, Alan Archibald2, Hirohide Uenishi, Christopher K. Tuggle3, Yasuhiro Takeuchi4, Max F. Rothschild3, Claire Rogel-Gaillard5, Chankyu Park6, Denis Milan7, Hendrik-Jan Megens1, Shengting Li8, Denis M. Larkin9, Heebal Kim10, Laurent A. F. Frantz1, Mario Caccamo11, Hyeonju Ahn10, Bronwen Aken12, Anna Anselmo13, Christian Anthon14, Loretta Auvil15, Bouabid Badaoui13, Craig W. Beattie16, Christian Bendixen8, Daniel Berman17, Frank Blecha18, Jonas Blomberg19, Lars Bolund8, Mirte Bosse1, Sara Botti13, Zhan Bujie8, Megan Bystrom3, Boris Capitanu15, Denise Carvalho-Silva20, Patrick Chardon5, Celine Chen21, Ryan Cheng3, Sang-Haeng Choi, William Chow12, Richard Clark12, C M Clee12, Richard P. M. A. Crooijmans1, Harry D. Dawson21, Patrice Dehais7, Fioravante De Sapio2, Bert Dibbits1, Nizar Drou11, Zhi-Qiang Du3, Kellye Eversole, João Fadista8, João Fadista22, Susan Fairley12, Thomas Faraut7, Geoffrey J. Faulkner22, Geoffrey J. Faulkner2, Katie E. Fowler23, Merete Fredholm14, Eric Fritz3, James G. R. Gilbert12, Elisabetta Giuffra13, Elisabetta Giuffra5, Jan Gorodkin14, Darren K. Griffin23, Jennifer Harrow12, Alexander Hayward24, Kerstin Howe12, Zhi-Liang Hu3, Sean Humphray12, Sean Humphray22, Toby Hunt12, Henrik Hornshøj8, Jin-Tae Jeon25, Patric Jern24, Matthew Jones12, Jerzy Jurka26, Hiroyuki Kanamori, Ronan Kapetanovic2, Jaebum Kim15, Jaebum Kim6, Jae-Hwan Kim, Kyu-Won Kim, Tae-Hun Kim, Greger Larson27, Kyooyeol Lee6, Kyung-Tai Lee, Richard M. Leggett11, Harris A. Lewin28, Yingrui Li, Wan Sheng Liu29, Jane E. Loveland12, Yao Lu, Joan K. Lunney17, Jian Ma15, Ole Madsen1, Katherine M. Mann22, Katherine M. Mann17, Lucy Matthews12, Stuart McLaren12, Takeya Morozumi, Michael P. Murtaugh30, Jitendra Narayan9, Dinh Truong Nguyen6, Peixiang Ni, Song-Jung Oh31, Suneel Kumar Onteru3, Frank Panitz8, Eung-Woo Park, Hong-Seog Park, Géraldine Pascal32, Yogesh Paudel1, Miguel Pérez-Enciso, Ricardo H. Ramirez-Gonzalez11, James M. Reecy3, Sandra L. Rodriguez-Zas15, Gary A. Rohrer17, Lauretta A. Rund15, Yongming Sang18, Kyle M. Schachtschneider15, Joshua G. Schraiber33, John C. Schwartz30, Linda Scobie34, Carol Scott12, Stephen M. J. Searle12, Bertrand Servin7, Bruce R. Southey15, Göran O. Sperber19, Peter F. Stadler35, Jonathan V. Sweedler15, Hakim Tafer35, Bo Thomsen8, Rashmi Wali34, Jian Wang, Jun Wang14, Simon D. M. White12, Xun Xu, Martine Yerle7, Guojie Zhang, Jianguo Zhang, Jie Zhang36, Shuhong Zhao36, Jane Rogers11, Carol Churcher12, Lawrence B. Schook15 
15 Nov 2012-Nature
TL;DR: The assembly and analysis of the genome sequence of a female domestic Duroc pig and a comparison with the genomes of wild and domestic pigs from Europe and Asia reveal a deep phylogenetic split between European and Asian wild boars ∼1 million years ago.
Abstract: For 10,000 years pigs and humans have shared a close and complex relationship. From domestication to modern breeding practices, humans have shaped the genomes of domestic pigs. Here we present the assembly and analysis of the genome sequence of a female domestic Duroc pig (Sus scrofa) and a comparison with the genomes of wild and domestic pigs from Europe and Asia. Wild pigs emerged in South East Asia and subsequently spread across Eurasia. Our results reveal a deep phylogenetic split between European and Asian wild boars ∼1 million years ago, and a selective sweep analysis indicates selection on genes involved in RNA processing and regulation. Genes associated with immune response and olfaction exhibit fast evolution. Pigs have the largest repertoire of functional olfactory receptor genes, reflecting the importance of smell in this scavenging animal. The pig genome sequence provides an important resource for further improvements of this important livestock species, and our identification of many putative disease-causing variants extends the potential of the pig as a biomedical model.

1,189 citations


Authors

Showing all 3733 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Anders Pape Møller135103471713
Christian Meyer93108138149
Joël Doré9128053288
Catherine Lapierre7922718286
André Mariotti7518418768
Michel Caboche7520623821
S. Dusko Ehrlich7318041241
Kris Verheyen6960318668
Harry Sokol6828120840
Claude Gaillardin6722117262
Didier Lereclus6518214778
Claire Chenu6421514659
Lise Jouanin6317213326
Cornelia Rumpel6124215495
Herman Höfte6110217559
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
202334
202293
2021189
2020214
2019209
2018249