scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Gilles Claus

Other affiliations: University of Strasbourg
Bio: Gilles Claus is an academic researcher from International Pentecostal Holiness Church. The author has contributed to research in topics: CMOS & Pixel. The author has an hindex of 25, co-authored 87 publications receiving 7494 citations. Previous affiliations of Gilles Claus include University of Strasbourg.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN as mentioned in this paper was designed to study proton-proton (and lead-lead) collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV (5.5 TeV nucleon-nucleon) and at luminosities up to 10(34)cm(-2)s(-1)
Abstract: The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector is described. The detector operates at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It was conceived to study proton-proton (and lead-lead) collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV (5.5 TeV nucleon-nucleon) and at luminosities up to 10(34)cm(-2)s(-1) (10(27)cm(-2)s(-1)). At the core of the CMS detector sits a high-magnetic-field and large-bore superconducting solenoid surrounding an all-silicon pixel and strip tracker, a lead-tungstate scintillating-crystals electromagnetic calorimeter, and a brass-scintillator sampling hadron calorimeter. The iron yoke of the flux-return is instrumented with four stations of muon detectors covering most of the 4 pi solid angle. Forward sampling calorimeters extend the pseudo-rapidity coverage to high values (vertical bar eta vertical bar <= 5) assuring very good hermeticity. The overall dimensions of the CMS detector are a length of 21.6 m, a diameter of 14.6 m and a total weight of 12500 t.

5,193 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a novel active pixel sensor (MAPS) for charged particle tracking made in a standard CMOS technology is proposed, which has a special structure, which allows the high detection efficiency required for tracking applications.
Abstract: A novel Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) for charged particle tracking made in a standard CMOS technology is proposed. The sensor is a photodiode, which is readily available in a CMOS technology. The diode has a special structure, which allows the high detection efficiency required for tracking applications. The partially depleted thin epitaxial silicon layer is used as a sensitive detector volume. Semiconductor device simulation, using either ToSCA based or 3-D ISE-TCAD software packages shows that the charge collection is efficient, reasonably fast (order of 100 ns), and the charge spreading limited to a few pixels only. A first prototype has been designed, fabricated and tested. It is made of four arrays each containing 64×64 pixels, with a readout pitch of 20 μm in both directions. The device is fabricated using standard submicron 0.6 μm CMOS process, which features twin-tub implanted in a p-type epitaxial layer, a characteristic common to many modern CMOS VLSI processes. Extensive tests made with soft X-ray source ( 55 Fe) and minimum ionising particles (15 GeV/ c pions) fully demonstrate the predicted performances, with the individual pixel noise (ENC) below 20 electrons and the Signal-to-Noise ratio for both 5.9 keV X-rays and Minimum Ionising Particles (MIP) of the order of 30. This novel device opens new perspectives in high-precision vertex detectors in Particle Physics experiments, as well as in other application, like low-energy beta particle imaging, visible light single photon imaging (using the Hybrid Photon Detector approach) and high-precision slow neutron imaging.

395 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
T. O. Ablyazimov1, A. Abuhoza, R. P. Adak2, M. Adamczyk3  +599 moreInstitutions (50)
TL;DR: The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will play a unique role in the exploration of the QCD phase diagram in the region of high net-baryon densities, because it is designed to run at unprecedented interaction rates.
Abstract: Substantial experimental and theoretical efforts worldwide are devoted to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter. At LHC and top RHIC energies, QCD matter is studied at very high temperatures and nearly vanishing net-baryon densities. There is evidence that a Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) was created at experiments at RHIC and LHC. The transition from the QGP back to the hadron gas is found to be a smooth cross over. For larger net-baryon densities and lower temperatures, it is expected that the QCD phase diagram exhibits a rich structure, such as a first-order phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter which terminates in a critical point, or exotic phases like quarkyonic matter. The discovery of these landmarks would be a breakthrough in our understanding of the strong interaction and is therefore in the focus of various high-energy heavy-ion research programs. The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will play a unique role in the exploration of the QCD phase diagram in the region of high net-baryon densities, because it is designed to run at unprecedented interaction rates. High-rate operation is the key prerequisite for high-precision measurements of multi-differential observables and of rare diagnostic probes which are sensitive to the dense phase of the nuclear fireball. The goal of the CBM experiment at SIS100 ( $\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$ 2.7--4.9 GeV) is to discover fundamental properties of QCD matter: the phase structure at large baryon-chemical potentials ( $\mu_B > 500$ MeV), effects of chiral symmetry, and the equation of state at high density as it is expected to occur in the core of neutron stars. In this article, we review the motivation for and the physics programme of CBM, including activities before the start of data taking in 2024, in the context of the worldwide efforts to explore high-density QCD matter.

279 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Betty Abelev1, Jaroslav Adam2, Dagmar Adamová3, Madan M. Aggarwal4  +1065 moreInstitutions (103)
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors proposed an ultra-light, high-resolution Inner Tracking System (ITS) based on monolithic CMOS pixel detectors for detection of heavy-flavour hadrons, and of thermal photons and low-mass di- electrons emitted by the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider).
Abstract: ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is studying the physics of strongly interacting matter, and in particular the properties of the Quark–Gluon Plasma (QGP), using proton–proton, proton–nucleus and nucleus–nucleus collisions at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus, planned for installation in the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018–2019. A key element of the ALICE upgrade is the construction of a new, ultra-light, high- resolution Inner Tracking System (ITS) based on monolithic CMOS pixel detectors. The primary focus of the ITS upgrade is on improving the performance for detection of heavy-flavour hadrons, and of thermal photons and low-mass di- electrons emitted by the QGP. With respect to the current detector, the new Inner Tracking System will significantly enhance the determination of the distance of closest approach to the primary vertex, the tracking efficiency at low transverse momenta, and the read-out rate capabilities. This will be obtained by seven concentric detector layers based on a 50 μm thick CMOS pixel sensor with a pixel pitch of about 30×30 μm2. This document, submitted to the LHCC (LHC experiments Committee) in September 2013, presents the design goals, a summary of the R&D activities, with focus on the technical implementation of the main detector components, and the projected detector and physics performance.

252 citations

ReportDOI
01 Feb 2010
TL;DR: The International Large Detector (ILD) is a concept for a detector at the International Linear Collider, ILC as discussed by the authors, which will collide electrons and positrons at energies of initially 500 GeV, upgradeable to 1 TeV.
Abstract: The International Large Detector (ILD) is a concept for a detector at the International Linear Collider, ILC. The ILC will collide electrons and positrons at energies of initially 500 GeV, upgradeable to 1 TeV. The ILC has an ambitious physics program, which will extend and complement that of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A hallmark of physics at the ILC is precision. The clean initial state and the comparatively benign environment of a lepton collider are ideally suited to high precision measurements. To take full advantage of the physics potential of ILC places great demands on the detector performance. The design of ILD is driven by these requirements. Excellent calorimetry and tracking are combined to obtain the best possible overall event reconstruction, including the capability to reconstruct individual particles within jets for particle ow calorimetry. This requires excellent spatial resolution for all detector systems. A highly granular calorimeter system is combined with a central tracker which stresses redundancy and efficiency. In addition, efficient reconstruction of secondary vertices and excellent momentum resolution for charged particles are essential for an ILC detector. The interaction region of the ILC is designed to host two detectors, which can be moved into the beam position with a push-pull scheme. The mechanical design of ILD and the overall integration of subdetectors takes these operational conditions into account.

202 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, results from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV in the CMS experiment at the LHC, using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.8 standard deviations.

8,857 citations

Book
Georges Aad1, E. Abat2, Jalal Abdallah3, Jalal Abdallah4  +3029 moreInstitutions (164)
23 Feb 2020
TL;DR: The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper, where a brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.
Abstract: The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper. A brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.

3,111 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
John Allison1, K. Amako2, John Apostolakis3, Pedro Arce4, Makoto Asai5, Tsukasa Aso6, Enrico Bagli, Alexander Bagulya7, Sw. Banerjee8, G. Barrand9, B. R. Beck10, Alexey Bogdanov11, D. Brandt, Jeremy M. C. Brown12, Helmut Burkhardt3, Ph Canal8, D. Cano-Ott4, Stephane Chauvie, Kyung-Suk Cho13, G.A.P. Cirrone14, Gene Cooperman15, M. A. Cortés-Giraldo16, G. Cosmo3, Giacomo Cuttone14, G.O. Depaola17, Laurent Desorgher, X. Dong15, Andrea Dotti5, Victor Daniel Elvira8, Gunter Folger3, Ziad Francis18, A. Galoyan19, L. Garnier9, M. Gayer3, K. Genser8, Vladimir Grichine7, Vladimir Grichine3, Susanna Guatelli20, Susanna Guatelli21, Paul Gueye22, P. Gumplinger23, Alexander Howard24, Ivana Hřivnáčová9, S. Hwang13, Sebastien Incerti25, Sebastien Incerti26, A. Ivanchenko3, Vladimir Ivanchenko3, F.W. Jones23, S. Y. Jun8, Pekka Kaitaniemi27, Nicolas A. Karakatsanis28, Nicolas A. Karakatsanis29, M. Karamitrosi30, M.H. Kelsey5, Akinori Kimura31, Tatsumi Koi5, Hisaya Kurashige32, A. Lechner3, S. B. Lee33, Francesco Longo34, M. Maire, Davide Mancusi, A. Mantero, E. Mendoza4, B. Morgan35, K. Murakami2, T. Nikitina3, Luciano Pandola14, P. Paprocki3, J Perl5, Ivan Petrović36, Maria Grazia Pia, W. Pokorski3, J. M. Quesada16, M. Raine, Maria A.M. Reis37, Alberto Ribon3, A. Ristic Fira36, Francesco Romano14, Giorgio Ivan Russo14, Giovanni Santin38, Takashi Sasaki2, D. Sawkey39, J. I. Shin33, Igor Strakovsky40, A. Taborda37, Satoshi Tanaka41, B. Tome, Toshiyuki Toshito, H.N. Tran42, Pete Truscott, L. Urbán, V. V. Uzhinsky19, Jerome Verbeke10, M. Verderi43, B. Wendt44, H. Wenzel8, D. H. Wright5, Douglas Wright10, T. Yamashita, J. Yarba8, H. Yoshida45 
TL;DR: Geant4 as discussed by the authors is a software toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter, which is used by a large number of experiments and projects in a variety of application domains, including high energy physics, astrophysics and space science, medical physics and radiation protection.
Abstract: Geant4 is a software toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. It is used by a large number of experiments and projects in a variety of application domains, including high energy physics, astrophysics and space science, medical physics and radiation protection. Over the past several years, major changes have been made to the toolkit in order to accommodate the needs of these user communities, and to efficiently exploit the growth of computing power made available by advances in technology. The adaptation of Geant4 to multithreading, advances in physics, detector modeling and visualization, extensions to the toolkit, including biasing and reverse Monte Carlo, and tools for physics and release validation are discussed here.

2,260 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Georges Aad1, Brad Abbott2, Jalal Abdallah3, Ovsat Abdinov4  +5117 moreInstitutions (314)
TL;DR: A measurement of the Higgs boson mass is presented based on the combined data samples of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN LHC in the H→γγ and H→ZZ→4ℓ decay channels.
Abstract: A measurement of the Higgs boson mass is presented based on the combined data samples of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN LHC in the H→γγ and H→ZZ→4l decay channels. The results are obtained from a simultaneous fit to the reconstructed invariant mass peaks in the two channels and for the two experiments. The measured masses from the individual channels and the two experiments are found to be consistent among themselves. The combined measured mass of the Higgs boson is mH=125.09±0.21 (stat)±0.11 (syst) GeV.

1,567 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a combined ATLAS and CMS measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates, as well as constraints on its couplings to vector bosons and fermions, are presented.
Abstract: Combined ATLAS and CMS measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates, as well as constraints on its couplings to vector bosons and fermions, are presented. The combination is based on the analysis of five production processes, namely gluon fusion, vector boson fusion, and associated production with a $W$ or a $Z$ boson or a pair of top quarks, and of the six decay modes $H \to ZZ, WW$, $\gamma\gamma, \tau\tau, bb$, and $\mu\mu$. All results are reported assuming a value of 125.09 GeV for the Higgs boson mass, the result of the combined measurement by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. The analysis uses the CERN LHC proton--proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS and CMS experiments in 2011 and 2012, corresponding to integrated luminosities per experiment of approximately 5 fb$^{-1}$ at $\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 20 fb$^{-1}$ at $\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV. The Higgs boson production and decay rates measured by the two experiments are combined within the context of three generic parameterisations: two based on cross sections and branching fractions, and one on ratios of coupling modifiers. Several interpretations of the measurements with more model-dependent parameterisations are also given. The combined signal yield relative to the Standard Model prediction is measured to be 1.09 $\pm$ 0.11. The combined measurements lead to observed significances for the vector boson fusion production process and for the $H \to \tau\tau$ decay of $5.4$ and $5.5$ standard deviations, respectively. The data are consistent with the Standard Model predictions for all parameterisations considered.

1,193 citations